Anime Companion Supplement - T


Ta - Tak -Tam - Te - Ter - Ti - To - Tok - Tokugawa - Tōkyō - Tom - Tsu

This series of pages is a supplement to two of my books The Anime Companion and The Anime Companion 2.

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See the regular entry pages for cross references between variant terms, differing spellings, English to Japanese terms and names:
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Special Supplement: Rurouni Kenshin OVAs

Each Supplement page consists of:
1. A list of entries in the books with page numbers.
2. New entries for items not found in the books.
3. Japanese characters for entries
4. Secondary sources used to find information for each entry.
5. Additional information for some entries.
6. Links to select Internet resources related to the entries.

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For more information about this supplement see The Anime Companion Supplement main page. Additions are announced in the Anime Companion Supplement News page and in my Blog.

Hyphenated Japanese terms are listed as single words.

The inclusion of an anime or manga title in these entries is not a recommendation of that title, see my Recommended Anime and Manga page for a list of my recommendations


tabako bon (tobacco stand or tray) 煙草盆
These could be as simple as a box or tray with containers for lit charcoal, ashes and tobacco or as complex as an ornamented standing piece of furniture with a small brazier and drawers.
Anime:
We see Fuji using a tabako bon as he smokes from a traditional kiseru (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.70) in Gokusen (ep 3)
Manga:
O-Kane uses a small tabako bon, just a tray with 3 compartments, in Blade of the Immortal: Trickster (v.15 ch. "Pity")
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v. 7 p.209) Oichi has a client who uses a very simple tabako bon, just a open box with a container for the coal and one for the ashes.
In Samurai Executioner (v.5 p.53) a prisoner requests a last smoke on the execution grounds, they bring her a medium sized tabako bon that has a handle built into it.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1564
Koizumi Kazuko, Traditional Japanese Furniture p.141
tabi (split-toed sock) 足袋 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.129)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1493
TABLE see:

chabudai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.17)

kotatsu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.74)

TABOO WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS see: imikotoba (taboo words and expressions)

tachi (top/butch) タチ or たち
A slang term used by Japanese lesbians (see: rezubian; The Anime Companion 2 p.73) and gay men. This term is derived from otachi, an old word for husband. It refers to the person in a relationship, physical or emotional, who assumes the dominant role. Tachi can be translated as top, butch, or masculine. A tachi is often assumed to be paired with a neko (queer slang) if they are in a relationship.
Anime:
Takami in F3: Frantic Frustrated and Female (ep.2) is a tachi.
Manga:
In Pink Sniper Haruna is very dominant in her relationships, sexually overpowering both young women and an unfortunate (?) boy.
Sources:
Long, Daniel. "Formation Processes of Some Japanese Gay Argot Terms" American Speech, Vol. 71, No. 2, (Summer, 1996), pp. 219

tachigui (standing eating) 立食い or 立ち食い
A type of inexpensive restaurant consisting of little more than a cooking area and counter with a very limited menu. These are usually found on the street and in or near train stations. There are no seats, customers stand and eat at the counter, often these serve noodles (men rui; The Anime Companion 2 p.56) such as rāmen (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.105), soba (The Anime Companion 2 p.90) or udon (The Anime Companion 2 p.110)
Anime:
In episode 5 of the Patlabor Original Series at a stand and eat noodle place in Tomakomai (The Anime Companion 2 p.105) Kai orders a bowl of noodles without negi (The Anime Companion 2 p.61) and adds shichimi tōgarashi (The Anime Companion 2 p.83) from a small red shaker.
Shoko works at a stand and eat noodle stand in City Hunter 2 (ep.14).
Sources:
Illustrated Living Japanese Style p.53
Illustrated Salaryman in Japan p.24
Tokyo Walking Around p.46
tachimono (something abstained from) たちもの or 断ち物 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.129)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.329
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1495
tachishōben (peeing in the street) 立ち小便 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.129)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.119
Discover Japan v.1 p.98
tachiyomi 立ち読み
The custom of standing and reading books and magazines in konbini (convenience store) and book stores, sometimes for extended periods of time. This is often used as a way to kill time while waiting for someone. This kind of browsing is not unusual in Japan and there are times shop keepers complain about it. Sometimes you see books and magazines, especially manga (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.80), that have shrink wrapped to encourage purchasing rather than reading in the store.
Anime:
In Ah! My Goddess Flights of Fancy (ep.21) Belldandy does tachiyomi in a bookstore as an evil deed, this after the horrible act of crossing against the light and before doing graffiti with chalk on a message board at a train station.
Manga:
In Fist of the Blue Sky (v.1 p.25) Professor Kondo points out that a bookdealer in Jimbōchō has complained that Professor Kasumi read a 1,000 page Chinese text and then transcribed his own copy.
In A Drifting Life (p.39) when Hiroshi finds his postcard comic has been published in the magazine Manga Yomimono, the bookdealer proceeds to dust in front of him to discourage his reading.
Sources:
Discover Japan v.1 p.174
Galbraith, Patrick. The Otaku Encyclopedia p.213

TAG (GAME) see: onigokko (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.101)

tai (sea bream) たい or 鯛 (The Anime Companion 2 p.94)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1333
taifū (typhoon) 台風 OLD FORM 颱風.(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1638
Today's Japan p.27

TAIGA DRAMA see: Taiga dorama (Taiga Drama)

Taiga dorama (Taiga Drama) 大河ドラマ
Beginning in 1963 NHK (see: Nippon Hōsō Kyōkai, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.96) has each year broadcast a jidaigeki (historical drama) series lasting, with a few exceptions, the whole year. These shows have very high production values and are assigned large budgets. The first was Hana no Shōgai, "Life of a Flower," and started on April 7, 1963 and ran until December 29 of that year. The next series Akō Rōshi was a major success with ratings reaching 53% started in January as has almost every series since. Most shows are set before the Meiji Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81), among those set later were a show set during World War II and one during the post war period. In the US subtitled over the air broadcasts of these series take place in Hawaii, the San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles area with a slight delay in scheduling.
Manga:
In a side note in volume 10 of Gals (p.61) the author mentions going to the Edo Tokyo Museum to see the "Toshiie to Matsu historical drama exhibit". Toshiie to Matsu was the 2002 Taiga dorama.
In volumes 11 of Death Note (ch. 95 p.132) during the NHN New Year's Music Show the forthcoming 2010 "historical drama" about Sakamoto Ryōma (The Anime Companion 2 p.76) is mentioned, in fact the 2010 Taiga dorama is about Ryōma.
In volume 3 of Gin Tama v.3 (ch.19) an actor sitting on the john is yacking on his cell phone and mentions signing up for the "Taiga Soap Opera". Soap Opera is a poor translation as soaps are only one kind of TV drama (terebi dorama). Later in volume 6 the note at the end of chapter 42 mentions that the manga was written to ride on the "coattails" of the Shinsengumi "Taiga series" which ran in 2004.
Sources:
Clements, Jonathan. The Dorama Encyclopedia p.158-159
Schilling, Mark. The Encyclopedia of Japanese Pop Culture p.244-49
Web Site:
大河ドラマ 天地人 (The official NHK Taiga Drama site)
taiko (large drum) 太鼓 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1497

TAIKOMOCHI see: hōkan (male geisha)

Taira [family] 平氏 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1498
Must-See in Kyōto p.178
Taira no Masakado 平将門 OLD FORM 平將門 (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p. 138
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p.41
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1499
tairyō-bata (large haul flag) 大漁旗
A large cloth banner with "large haul" 大漁 painted in large Chinese characters (see: kanji, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.61) and often, in smaller characters, the name of the ship owner. These are used to signal to land that a big catch has been made that day. When such a catch is made the flag is hoisted on a bamboo pole, usually with a celebratory feasting song.
Anime and Manga:
We see a boat and a fisherman’s banner with the kanji for "Big Catch" in the Okinawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.99) arc of GTO (ep.38, v.12 ch 97) as the class heads to Iriomotejima.
Anime:
The police boat the mechanics improperly use for off shore fishing returns with a banner out in Patlabor the TV Series (ep. 3) as the banner comes into view we can see the name of Special Vehicles 2, 特車 2, on it.
Sources:
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.196

TAISHAKUTEN DAIKYOJI see: Kyōei-zan Daikyōji

Taishō jidai (Taishō Period) 大正時代 (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1502

TAISHŌ PERIOD see: Taishō jidai (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)

TAITŌ DISTRICT see: Taitō-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)

TAITŌ WARD see: Taitō-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)

Taitō-ku 台東区 OLD FORM 臺東區 (The Anime Companion 2 p.95)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia 1504
Tokyo Metropolitan Atlas p.14-15
Web Sites:
Taitō (official site)
tai-yaki たいやき or 鯛焼き (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.133, Eating in Japan p.134
Takahama Kyoshi 高浜虚子 OLD FORM 高濱虛子
1874-1959 A novelist and haiku poet. Born in Matsuyama he dropped out of school and moved to Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) in 1894 to study Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) literature. When his mentor Masaoka Shiki was having trouble with his haiku magazine Hototogisu Takahama took over the position of editor and publisher. He not only expanded the literary scope of Hototogisu but also helped young writers gain needed exposure. Takahama continued to write and edit for the rest of his life. In 1954 he was given the Order of Culture.
Manga:
Takahama Kyoshi is mentioned in The Times of Botchan (v.1 p. 15, 18)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p. 1506
Takamagahara (plain of high heaven) 高天が原 OR 高天原(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1508

TAKAMANOHARA. see: Takamagahara (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)

takarabune (treasure ship) 宝船
A treasure ship often depicted with the seven deities of good fortune (Shichifuku-jin; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.117) riding on it. Prints and pictures of such a ship are a New Year's tradition. In the Muromachi Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90) a custom of sleeping with such a picture under the pillow developed as a way to have a good first dream of the year (see: hatsuyume (first dream of the year). This custom later spread to commoners in the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25).
Anime:
In Pom Poko we see a group of tanuki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133) load up a takarabune before heading down the Tamagawa river.
In episode 17 of Ranma 1/2 Anything Goes Martial Arts we see a treasure ship in Kuno's dream with Akane and Ranma-chan in it.
Sources:
Illustrated A Look Into Japan p.101, 103
Kiritani, Elizabeth. Vanishing Japan p.156
Takarazuka Kagekidan (Takarazuka Opera Company) 宝塚歌劇団 OLD FORM 宝塚歌劇團 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.131)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1511
Web sites:
Takarazuka Kagekidan official English site

TAKARAZUKA OPERA COMPANY see: Takarazuka Kagekidan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.131)

Takasugi Shinsaku 高杉晋作 FORMAL 高杉晉作 (The Anime Companion 2 p.96)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1512
Image of Takasugi Shinsaku

TAKECHI HANPEITA see: Takechi Zuizan

Takechi Zuizan 武市瑞山
1829-65 Also known as Takechi Hanpeita. His father was a rural samurai of Tosa han (The Anime Companion 2 p.106). As a young man he traveled to Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) where he met supporters of sonnō jōi (The Anime Companion 2 p.90) and converted to their viewpoint. On his return to Tosa he became the founder of the Tosa Kinnōtō (Tosa Loyalist Party), among the early members were Sakamoto Ryōma (The Anime Companion 2 p.76) and Nakaoka Shintaro. His group assassinated Yoshida Tōyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.118), an important han advisor, and gained great influence in local politics for awhile. He even dispatched hito-kiri to Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). A few years after his group's fall from power he was ordered to commit seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115)
Manga:
Takechi shows up as a companion to Katsu Kaishū (The Anime Companion 2 p.42) in Vanity Angel (issue 5)
Sources:
Hillsborough, Romulus. Shinsengumi p.66
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1513

TAKECHIYO see: Tokugawa Nobuyasu

takenokawa (bamboo sheaths used as wrappers) 竹の皮 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.131)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.51
takenoko (bamboo shoot) たけのこ or 竹の子 or 筍 (The Anime Companion 2 p.96)
Sources:
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi. World Food Japan p. 65
Eating in Japan p.31, p.100
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.153
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.389)
takeuma (bamboo horse or stilts) 竹馬 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.131)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.542
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1458

TAKING OFF SHOES see: genkan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.34)

TAKIZAWA BAKIN see: Bakin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)

tako (octopus) たこ or 蛸 or 章魚 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.131)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.292
tako-age (kite flying) 凧揚げ (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.132)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.796
Joya, Mock. Japanese Customs and Manners p.9, p.50
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.516
A Look Into Tokyo p.23, 27
takoyaki 蛸焼き OR たこ焼き(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.132)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.124
Must-See in Nikko p.103
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1517
Takuan Sōhō 沢庵宗彭 FORMAL 澤庵宗彭 (The Anime Companion 2 p.96)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1518
Frederic, Louis. Japan Encyclopedia p.942
Enbutsu Sumiko. Old Tokyo p.140
takushi (taxi) タクシー (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133)
Sources:
Living Japanese Style p.30-1
A Look Into Tokyo p.179
Japanese Family and Culture p.127
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman. Japanese Etiquette Today p.55
Today's Japan p.108

TALE OF GENJI see: Genji Monogatari

TALES BEGUN ON THE NIGHT OF THE RAT see: Kasshi-yawa ("Tales Begun on the Night of the Rat")

TALES OF TIMES NOW PAST see: Konjaku monogatari

TALISMANS, SHINTŌ see:

ofuda (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.98)

omamori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.100)
Tama Chiku (Tama Area) 多摩地区 (The Anime Companion 2 p.97)
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p. 139
Tama Nyū Taun (Tama New Town) 多摩ニュータウン (The Anime Companion 2 p.97)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p. 1520

TAMA RIVER see: Tamagawa

Tamagawa 多摩川
A major river flowing 126 kilometers (78 miles) through the full length of Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104). The upper watershed flows from the Chichibu highlands in Yamanashi Ken to Tōkyō Bay (see: Tōkyō Wan; The Anime Companion 2 p.105). Entering Tōkyō in Okutama-machi the river flows from Okutamako Lake, through Okutama-machi and Ōme-shi then along the borders of Akiruno-shi, Hamura-shi, Fusa-shi, Akishima-shi, Hachiōji-shi (The Anime Companion 2 p.25), Hino-shi, Tama-shi, Fuchū-shi, Inagi-shi and Chōfu-shi. From this point the river forms the border between Tōkyō and Kanagawa Ken (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.60) flowing south of Chōfu-shi, Komae-shi, Setagaya-ku and finally Ōta-ku where it enters the Bay. The Tamagawa is a major water source for Tōkyō, as it once was for Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18), and also is a recreational resource. The Tamagawa water system for delivering water to the city has been in existence since 1653.
Anime:
In Pom Poko we see a group of tanuki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133) load up a takarabune (treasure ship) before heading down the Tamagawa on it.
Manga:
In Hot Gimmick (v.1 p.179) the author mentions the summer fireworks show on the Tama river.
The normally shy with girls Hiba takes Iko rowing on the Tama river in Wild 7 (v.5 p.81).
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p.14
Naito Akira. Edo: The City That Became Tokyo p.74
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1520
Tokyo Metropolitan Atlas 92-93, 58-59, 56-57, 66-67, 26-27, 24-25 (this sequence follows the river flow from the highlands to the bay.)
tamago (egg) 卵 or たまご (The Anime Companion 2 p.97)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.154
tamago dōfu (egg tōfu) たまごどうふ or 卵豆腐
A type of egg custard made by cooking egg with dashi (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) and shaping it in the form of a block. Usually it is served chilled with a warijōyu sauce.
Manga:
Called "egg tōfu" in Doing Time (p.120) it is one of the foods for the New Year mentioned in the story.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.154
tamago-zake (egg yolk in sake) 卵酒 (The Anime Companion 2 p.97)
Sources:
Joya, Mock, Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.62
Tamaya 玉屋
A major manufacturer of fireworks (hanabi The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39) in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18). The founder had been an apprentice of their major competitor the Kagiya company. Each year the companies would try to out do each other in the making to beautiful displays. Some ukiyo-e prints often have fireworks that are known to be designs by this company. The Tamaya company went out of business in 1834 after their factory burned down in a fire and the family was exiled for the destruction of the neighborhood.
Manga:
Spectators shout out Tamaya! Kagiya! at the Ryōgoku River Festival fireworks show on the Sumidagawa (The Anime Companion 2 p.93) in Samurai Executioner (v.6 p.188)
Sources:
Hanabi: The Fireworks of Japan p.69
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.376
Waley, Paul. Tokyo: City of Stories p.117
tameshigiri (sword test cut) 試し斬り, 試し切り, 試斬, 試切
Testing a sword (see: nihontō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.95) by cutting something. The common target for this practice is usually green bamboo or rolled and tied straw mats standing upright. Starting in the Sengoku Jidai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.113) tameshigiri was sometimes done on a human body, either living or a corpse, condemned criminals and their bodies were usually used for such testing. This type of testing would enable a skilled swordsman to determine if the sword was properly balanced and capable of efficient cutting. It was not usual to do a single cut through more than one body, there are records of as many as seven in one stroke. In some cases the result of the test and name of the tester would be inscribed on the tang of a sword. During the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) some carried out tsujigiri to test swords and the shōgunate (see: bakufu, The Anime Companion 2 p.8) had to enforce laws against doing this.
Anime:
One of the lackies of the daikan's (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) son asks if he can do a test cut on Fuu in Samurai Champloo (ep.1).
Manga:
In Ōoku (v.2 p.90) Tokugawa Iemitsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) has snuck out of Edo Castle (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) with Inaba Masakatsu and wishes to test his sword on a vagrant beggar.
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.5 p.161-167) we see Yamada Asaemon do a sword test on the body of a dead prisoner. The entry includes information on procedures for doing such testing.
Since Samurai Executioner is about the third historical Yamada Asaemon it is not surprising to find more than one instance of tameshigiri in the series. In volume 1 (p.16) Asaemon's first tameshigiri is discussed, in the 2nd volume Asaemon travels to train for tameshigiri (p.104), tests several swords later (p.153) and finally has 4 bodies stacked 2 by 2, one of which is living for practice cuts (p.189). In the 4th volume (p.148) an artist visits Asaemon with drawings of various types of cuts used in tameshigiri.
Sources:
Frederic, Louis. Dictionary of the Martial Arts p.228
Kim Sun-Jin, et al. Tuttle Dictionary of the Martial Arts of Korea, China & Japan p.273
Obata Toshishiro. Shinkendo Tameshigiri p.37-38
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.125
Yumoto, John M. The Samurai Sword A Handbook p.74, 81
Tanabata 七夕 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.128, p.239
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1522

TANG MEIN see: tanmen

TANGERINE see: mikan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.82)

TANGO FESTIVAL see: Kodomo-no-Hi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.72)

TANGO NO SEKKU see: Kodomo-no-Hi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.72)

tankororin (persimmon yōkai) たんころりん
A type of yōkai which forms from unpicked persimmons (see: kaki, The Anime Companion 2 p.37). One legend says that in the Nijuninmachi area of Sendai a bōzu (Buddhist priest or monk) was seen with persimmons tucked in his sleeves. The monk entered a garden and disappeared behind one of the persimmon trees there. An old man identified the monk as a tankororin.
Manga:
Kitsuneko tries to intimidate Ren by using different yōkai including tankororin in Kon Kon Kokon (v.1 p.107).
Sources:
Mizuki Shigeru. Yōkai: Dictionnaire des Monstres Japonais v.2 p.159
tanima no shirayuri (white lily of the valley) 谷間の白百合
Ejaculation resulting from paizuri (tit job). While usually translated as "white lily of the valley" the term tanima actually means ravine or gorge and refers to something a steeper and narrower than the usual image of a valley. The poetic images does not refer to any particular species of flower rather to any white lily (yuri) in a ravine. Sometimes the phrase tanima no yuri is used.
Anime:
A character gets ferachio (fellatio) and tit fucked to ejaculation by Mia in F3: Frantic Frustrated and Female (ep.3), listen and you will hear the word paizuri used.
Yuki enjoys paizuri with Hiroko's breasts until he comes in Haitoku no Shojo - Family of Debauchery (ep 2).
Sources:
Constantine, Peter. Japanese Street Slang p.110
Sinclair, Joan. Pink Box: Inside Japan’s Sex Clubs p.189

TANIMA NO YURI see: tanima no shirayuri (white lily of the valley)

Tanizaki Jun'ichirō 谷崎潤一郎 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1526
tankōbon (a separate book volume) 単行本
A separate book volume, this term applies to any type of book, including manga in book form. In the case of manga tankōbon are usually small paperbacks often with dust wrappers. In Japan almost all manga tankōbon are collections of chapters originally published in magazines and on higher quality paper than magazines use. In the US manga are usually published directly in this format as most publishers have abandoned serialization in magazines or as comic books. Sales of popular titles can be in the millions of copies per volume.
Anime:
Tankōbon show up in many anime and manga. One place where volumes for actual releases are shown is in Otaku no Video (3rd animation sequence) in Tanaka's apartment when Kubo goes to visit him. Included on the shelves are Rose Of Versailles (see: Berusaiyu no Bara, The Anime Companion 2 p.9), Black Jack, Ashita no Joe, and others.
Sources:
Lehmann, Timothy R. Manga: Masters of the Art p.249
Thompson, Jason. Manga: The Complete Guide p.501
MacWilliams, Mark W. (ed.) Japanese Visual Culture p.13
tanmen タンメン or たんめん
A Chinese dish, Tang mein, found in Chinese (chūka ryōri-ya; The Anime Companion 2 p.14) or shokudō, restaurants that serve a variety of cuisines. Tanmen consists of Chinese noodles with little pieces of pork, some vegetables often carrot (ninjin; The Anime Companion 2 p.63), mushrooms, hakusai (Chinese cabbage), sliced bamboo shoot (takenoko; The Anime Companion 2 p.96) served in a bowl in pork broth.
Anime:
Tang mein is ordered at a restaurant in Martian Successor Nadesico (ep.23)
Instant tanmen mentioned when Noa is taking orders for dinner in the Patlabor OVA Original Series (ep. 2).
Manga:
A woman walks into a Chinese restaurant in Old Boy (v.2 p.51) and orders tanmen noodles.
Sources:
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.34 35, 56
Satterwhite, Robb. What’s What in Japanese Restaurants p.135

TANNED 'TIL DARK GIRLS see: ganguro (black face)

tanshin funin (absent father) 単身赴任
Literally this means "Proceeding to a new post alone". When a father is assigned a new position away from the city he lives in it is not unusual for the mother and children to stay behind for some time, even years. There are several social pressures against moving, a major one is to avoid the disruption moving would have on a child's education. Another factor is the effect on home ownership, selling one's home and buying a new one is an added financial burden many families did not wish to make. The new posting could mean a promotion, or future promotion for the worker so turning such a position down could have a negative effect on advancement. This phenomenon became more common in the 1970s and 80s. In the mid 1980s it is estimated that 134,000 employees a year were in such a situation. Most companies provided special allowances to assist families in this situation.
Anime and Manga:
In Video Girl Ai Yota has no mother and his father, a designer, is usually working away from home for months at a time.
Anime:
In Kimagure Orange Road Madoka and her sister live together in the family home while their parents, professional musicians, live in the United States
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1710
tansu (wooden chest) 箪笥 FORMAL 簞笥 (The Anime Companion 2 p.97)
Sources:
Bornoff, Nicholas and Michael Freeman. Things Japanese p.12-13
Outlook on Japan p.43
tanuki 狸 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1528, 1364
Joya, Mock. Japanese Customs and Manners p.55
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.10

TANUKI DOMBURI see: ten-don

tanzaku 短冊 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.87
Japanese Family and Culture p.86)

TAPIR see: Baku (dream eater) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.9)

taraibune (tub boat) 盥舟 or 盥船 (The Anime Companion 2 p.98)
Sources:
Waycott, Agness. Sado: Japan’s Island in Exile p.114

TARO see: satoimo (taro)

TARO STEMS, DRIED see: higozuiki (Higo dried taro stems)

taryū-jiai (duel) 他流試合 (The Anime Companion 2 p.98)
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. The Lone Samurai and the Martial Arts p.66
tasuki (cord to tie sleeves)
A cord or band of cloth to tie up the wide sleeves of traditional Japanese clothing. This was done so that the tasuki went around each upper arm near the shoulders and crossed in the back. The tasuki holds the sleeves in place so they do not interfere with the task at hand. Tasuki are used during housework, labor, at festivals, in combat and during martial arts training, all of these are conditions where the sleeves could interfere with activity. Tasuki can also be used in a symbolic manner as part of ceremonial dress during religious events or when a single band is draped from shoulder to waste by campaigning politicians, in this case the name of the politician will be written on the tasuki.
Anime and Manga:
We see tasuki used in Ai Yori Aoshi (ep. 2 and v.1 p.103)
Anime:
Domestic use of tasuki while doing chores is seen in Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1530
Skoss, Diane, ed. Sword & Spirit: Classical Warrior Traditions of Japan p.61
tatami 畳 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.182
Japanese Family and Culture p.49
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1530
tatari (curse or spiritual retribution) 祟り
A sign, often in the form of a curse, sent by a kami (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59) or spirit. These are usually in response to an offense or slight on the part of a person. The form of the tatari may vary, sickness and possession being two common forms. The tatari can be dispelled with the proper rituals and making amends.
Anime:
In Princess Mononoke the village is attacked by what is referred to as a tatari-gami. Ashitaka's affliction is the tatari of the kami transferred to him.
Other cases of anime where if you listen you can hear the word tatari include: GTO (ep.23) where Onizuka is convinced he is cursed; Ayakashi Samurai Horror Tales: Yotsuya Ghost Story (Act 2) when characters speak of Oiwa's curse (see: Tōkaidō Yotsuya Kaidan (Ghost Story of Tōkaidō Yotsuya); and Kami Chu! (ep.12) where Yurie uses the term on the roof and it is translated as "divine punishment".
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.200

TATTOO see: irezumi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50)

TATTOO OF CHERRY BLOSSOMS ON RIGHT SHOULDER see: Tōyama no Kinsan

TAXI see: takushi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133)

tayū 太夫
A Chinese loan word that means "master", originally this was applied to 5th rank officials of the Imperial Court. After some time it was adopted by shrine (jinja; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.54) and temple (jiin; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.53) performers as a suffix, pronounced "dayū", to their names. During the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) it had other uses. One was for the highest ranking courtesans of the pleasure quarters. The qualifications were so high that from the mid 17th century until the mid 18th the number of tayū in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) declined from seventy-five to one, after that time there were none in Edo. However the term was at times used in an honorific way rather than as an official rank. One reason for this is many early tayū came from impoverished high ranking families, the standards involved not only beauty but deportment and skills. The rank did survive in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). Another use of the term was for onnagata performers in kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35), who often played tayū in stage productions. It is also applied to musicians if they belonged to the tokiwazu or kiyomoto schools of gidayū and jōruri. Eventually the term lost prestige in the theater and was applied to any performer, even performing animals. The term was also applied to Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) priests and in some areas is still used.
Anime:
In Peacemaker (ep 12) Akesato is a tayū.
Manga:
In volume 2 of Kaze Hikaru (p.19) there is talk of paying for a tayū as it is Kamiya's first trip to Shimabara, later in volume 5 (p.17-18) we see the kagema Yukiya who is nicknamed the "no-dance tayu" due to an injured leg.
Sources:
Dougill, John. Kyōto: A Cultural History p.177-179
Leiter , Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.642-643
Seigle, Cecilia Segawa. Yoshiwara: The Glittering World of the Japanese Courtesan p,34-36

TB see: kekkaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.44)

TEA BOWL see: chawan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.18)

TEA CEREMONY see: cha-no-yu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.17)

TEA CEREMONY SWEETS see: yokan (The Anime Companion 2 p.117)

TEA ON RICE see: chazuke (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.18)

TEA see: cha (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.16)

TEACHER OF THE LUNAR CALENDAR see: reki-hakase (high master of calendar-making)

TEAHOUSE see: kagemajaya (kagema tea house)

TEETH BLACKENED see: ohaguro

TEGATA see: sekisho tegata (travel pass)

Teikoku Daigaku (Imperial Universities) 帝国大学 OLD FORM 帝國大學 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.596
Teikoku Hoteru (Imperial Hotel) 帝国ホテル OLD FORM 帝國ホテル (The Anime Companion 2 p.98)
Sources:
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p. 236
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.593
Look Into Tokyo p.99
Web Sites:
The Imperial Hotel (Tōkyō)

TEISHINTAI see: ianfu (comfort women)

teishoku (set meal) ていしょく or 定食 (The Anime Companion 2 p.98)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.156

TELECLUB see: terekura (telephone club)

TELEPHONE CLUB see: terekura

TELEPHONES see: denwa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.22)

TELEVISION see: terebi (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

temari てまり
Handball. A popular traditional toy, after the 13th century these were made of cotton and yarn and decorated with colorful silks. In urban areas games with temari are at times played indoors and in rural areas outdoors. One game is played by bouncing the ball up and down while singing a short song. At the end of the song one has gained one point.
Manga:
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.1 p.268) we see two girls play a bouncing game with a temari which leads Ōgami to recollect the incidents that led him and his son to a life as assassins.
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.543
tembimbō (carrying pole) 天秤棒
A wooden carrying pole for heavy loads, usually 1.8 meters (5.9 feet) long. These function much like a the arms of a scale with loads balanced at each end. The pole could be used over one or both shoulders, the hand being used to keep the load stable. Also romanized as tenbinbō.
Anime:
Tembimbō are seen in InuYasha (ep.2) and My Neighbor Totoro.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1546
temizuya 手水屋 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shintō p.200
Illustrated A Look Into Japan p.20

TEMMAN TENJIN see: Sugawara-no-Michizane (The Anime Companion 2 p.91)

TEMPLE BELL see: bonshō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.13)

TEMPLE OF THE GOLDEN PAVILION see: Kinkakuji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.69)

TEMPURA see: tenpura (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

TEN THOUSAND LEAVES (MAN'YOSHŪ) see: Man'yōshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.80)

TENBINBŌ see: tembimbō

TENDAI SECT see: Tendaishū (Tendai sect)

Tendaishū (Tendai sect) 天台宗
The Tendai sect of Buddhism. In 806 Saichō established this sect in Japan when he brought in T'ien-t'ai teachings from China. Tendai and Shingon were the two major sects of the Heian Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44) . Later popular Buddhist movements, the Nichirenshū (Nichiren sect) and Jōdō sects, had origins in Tendai. Japanese Tendai differs from it's Chinese origins in that it also includes many of the esoteric teachings of Shingonshū (Shingon sect of Buddhism). This mixture was required by the emperor Kammu and the sect remained closely associated with the nobility until the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25). During the Sengoku jidai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.113) Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65) ordered the destruction of the Enryakuji temple complex on Hieizan (The Anime Companion 2 p.28) ending much of the political influence the sect had. Today the headquarters is still Enryakuji.
Manga:
Gokokusan Tennoji Temple Tendai Sect Tennoji-cho Shimoya Yanaka is on a list of temples having hojicho in Lady Snowblood (v.2 p.32)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1549
tendon (tenpura and rice) てんどん or 天丼 (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)
Source:
Eating in Japan p. 73
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1549
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p. 20-21
tengai (basket-like hat) 天蓋
A woven hat that completely covered the head from view with a series of slits at the front so the wearer could see where they were going. These were worn by the wandering komusō of the Fukeshū sect of Zen Buddhism (The Anime Companion 2 p.122) who would often play their shakuhachi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.116) while wearing the hat. This hat made the garb of the komusō useful as a disguise for those wishing to travel incognito or for ninja spies. The term is the same as used for canopies or umbrellas used over statues of the Buddha or priests in processions.
Anime:
A large group of Fukeshū komusō wearing tengai cross Nihonbashi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.94) in Samurai Champloo (ep.6)
An interesting improvised tengai is in Maison Ikkoku (ep.37) when Yotsuya-san uses a paper bag with holes for the eyes, other than that he has the full garb of a komusō.
Manga:
In Lone Wolf and Cub (for example: v.1 p.167 and v.10 p.113) we see the garb of a Fukeshū komusō used as a disguise.
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. Ninja AD 1460 - 1650 p.18, 27
Turnbull, Stephen. Samurai Warriors p.156
tengu (demon) 天狗 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1549
A Look Into Japan p.105
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.86

TENGU PARTY see: Tengutō

Tengutō 天狗党
The Tengutō was a pro-imperial political faction in Mito han (The Anime Companion 2 p.57) that emerged during a succession dispute in 1829 over who would be the new daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15), Tokugawa Nariaki, who the Tengutō supported became daimyō. In 1864 open conflict broke out between the Tengutō and the pro bakufu (The Anime Companion 2 p.8) shosei (student faction) which quickly led to civil war. Eventually the Tokugawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) government sent in it's troops to put down what was a rebellion against it's authority. The Tengutō forces on Mt Tsukuba marched towards Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) taking supplies from the villagers and drafting peasants into their band. Angered by this peasants captured and killed any members of the band they could. After six months of often bloody fighting and executions the Tengutō was defeated and it's leaders Takeda Kōunsai and Fujita Koshirō as well as many of their followers were executed. Over 1,300 died in Mito and hundreds in other han during the length of the conflict. Later there would be a long series of executions of members of Tengutō families down to small male children, when the Meiji Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81) began prisoners, many just girls, still living were released from jail and there were years of retaliatory killings by imperial loyalists.
Anime:
A group of thugs calls itself the Tengutō, translated as "Tengu party", in Rurouni Kenshin (ep.77)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.979
Satow, Ernest. Diplomat in Japan p.380-382
Yamakawa Kikue. Women of the Mito Domain: Recollections of Samurai Family Life p.26, 116-118,120-121,129
tenisu (tennis) テニス (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)
Sources:
Living in Japan p.253
Martial Arts & Sports in Japan p.177
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1552

TENJIN see: Sugawara-no-Michizane (The Anime Companion 2 p.91)

TENJUIN see: Sen Hime (Princess Sen)

TENNIS see: tenisu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)

tennyo (heavenly maiden, nymph, angel) 天女 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.187
tenpura てんぷら or 天婦羅 or 天麩羅 (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)
Sources:
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p. 483
Eating in Japan p.36
Hosking, Richard. Dictionary of Japanese Food p.157
Outlook on Japan p.146
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1549

TENPURA AND RICE see: tendon (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

TENPURA DONBUTI see: tendon (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

TENPURA NOODLES see: tenpura soba (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

tenpura soba (tenpura noodles) 天ぷらそば OR 天麩羅蕎麦 OLD FORM 天麩羅蕎麥 (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)
Sources:
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.34, 35
Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū 天真正伝香取神道流
Also known as Katori Shintō-ryū, the name can be translated as "The Shintō tradition which flows from a true and correct transmission from the deity of Katori Shrine". Katori jingu is a Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) shrine located in present day Chiba Ken (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.18). Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū is believed by many to be the oldest existing ryū (The Anime Companion 2 p.75) of bujutsu surviving for over 600 years of unbroken lineage. This kenjutsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.45) school also teaches the oldest known form of iai-jutsu (see: battō-jutsu The Anime Companion 2 p.9) as well as the use of bo (staff), naginata (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.91), yari (spear), and other weapons was founded in the 15th century by Iizasa Choisai Ienao. It applies principles from Shintō as well as Zen Buddhism (The Anime Companion 2 p.122) to its techniques. Also incorporated are rituals to Marishiten and the mudra (see: inzō; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50) of the kuji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.75), which are used in the kata (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.64) of the school, these are considered elements that strengthen the psycho-physical dominance of the practitioner in the battlefield. Part of the advanced training are several disciplines for use in actual warfare, including ninjutsu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.95). Today Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū is officially classed as a Cultural Treasure of Japan. One of the most famous swordsmen of Japan who studied this ryū was Kamiizumi Nobutsuna, and one of the most famous non-Japanese was the martial arts scholar Donn Draeger.
Anime:
In Sword for Truth listen carefully at the beginning of the fighting scene with Tashiro Gunbei and you will hear him say Tenshin Shoden Katori Shintō-ryū which is weirdly translated as: "I have been taught by Master Katori in the Divine Shintō style"
Sources:
Frederic, Louis. Dictionary of the Martial Arts p.108.
Hall, Davis Avalon. Marishiten: Buddhism and the Warrior Goddess p.274-
Kim Sun-Jin, Daniel Kogan, Nikolaos Kontoglannis & Hall Wong. Tuttle Dictionary of the Martial Arts of Korea, China & Japan p.277.
Lowry, Dave. "Promise and Peril: The Potential of Following Multiple Koryu" in Keiko Shokon, edited by Diane Skoss, p.51
Skoss, Meik & Diane "Field Guide to the Classical Japanese Martial Arts' in Sword & Spirit, edited by Diane Skoss, p.67-69.
Skoss, Diane "Field Guide to the Classical Japanese Martial Arts' in Koryu Bujutsu, edited by Diane Skoss, p.85.
Hall, David A. "Marishiten Buddhist Influences on Combattive Behavior" in Koryu Bujutsu, edited by Diane Skoss, p.110-112
tenshō ken'ō shisetsu 天正遣欧使節 OLD FORM 天正遣歐使節 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.978
tensui-oke (rainwater buckets) 天水桶
Tensui-oke means rainwater-bucket, originally these were buckets on rooftops and under eaves to catch water. Later they were stacked in several spots in each urban locality on top of a cistern to provide water for firefighting. These would consist of a cistern or barrel topped with a square lid on top of the lid would be buckets stacked in a pyramid shape with a small roof placed over them. A related practice exists today with fire extinguishers placed on the streets to be used should a fire break out.
Anime:
These are often found in street scene for stories taking place in the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25). For example Act 1 of Ayakashi Samurai Horror Tales: Goblin Cat and when the boy sneaks about in Samurai Champloo (ep.4).
Manga:
These are also seen in: Lone Wolf and Cub (v.2 p.10) and near the end of chapter 11 in Yagyu Ninja Scrolls: Revenge of the Hori Clan (v.2).
Sources:
Illustrated A Look Into Tokyo p.69
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.197

TEN-TSUKI see: tokoroten-tsuki (extruder for tokoroten)

teppan (iron plate) てっぱん or 鉄板 OLD FORM 鐵板 (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.49
Hosking, Richard. Dictionary of Japanese Food p.157
teppō (firearm) 鉄砲 OLD FORM 鐵礮 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.375
Parker, L. Craig. The Japanese Police System Today p.196
Teppō Bugyō (Commissioner of Firearms) 鉄砲奉行
A special office during the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) under the control of the bakufu (The Anime Companion 2 p.8). The Teppō Bugyō controlled the manufacture of firearms in all of Japan. Permission was required from the Teppō Bugyō for any gunsmith to make a firearm for any customer. To prevent illegal gun manufacturing a stipend was paid to the gunsmith families and regular orders were placed for new guns or repairs to provide additional income for the families.
Manga:
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.5 p.225) the commander of the Ōsaka Castle guards rifle detachment hires Ōgami Ito to deal with a gunsmith quickly as asking the Teppō Bugyō to investigate would take too long.
Sources:
Kopel, David B. "Japanese Gun Control" Asia Pacific Law Review v.2 n.2 1993 p.26-52
Schreiber, Mark. The Dark Side p.117

TERA see: jiin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.53)

Terada Torahiko 寺田寅彦 FORMAL 寺田寅彥
1878-1935 A physicist and essayist, also known as Yoshimura Fuyuhiko. As a student at the Fifth Higher School in Kumamoto he began writing haiku under the inspiration of the writings of Natsume Sōseki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.91). He received his doctorate at Tokyo University (see: Tōkyō Daigaku, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138) in 1908 and in 1909 went to Europe for further studies in geology and seismology. He then taught at Tokyo University starting in 1916. He is best known for his literary essays. He even wrote an essay on yōkai: "Bakemono no shinka" where he wrote on the elusiveness of explaining yōkai.
Anime:
Terada, from Tokyo Imperial University, shows up at a meeting on improving Tokyo in Doomed Megalopolis (ep.1).
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Pandemonium and Parade p.157
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1554
terebi (television) テレビ (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)
Sources:
Outlook on Japan p.59
Condon, Jack and Camy Condon. The Simple Pleasures of Japan p.24
terebi dorama テレビドラマ
TV drama programs. These are commonly TV shows dramatizing real life situations. They may take place in modern times or in the past. Sometimes these are mistakenly called 'soap operas' by Americans, however they are not soaps as technically soaps involve wealthy people's petty problems and are only one kind of drama program. The first dorama was Yūgemae (Before Dinner) a 12 minute program broadcast in 1940 as an experiment demonstrating what could be done with television. The war ended all TV research in Japan so there were no further TV dramas until 1953. Today these shows make up a large portion of programing, each is a finite series of episodes in one story, usually 26 weeks long, with each episode functioning as a chapter in a longer story. Some run as long as a full year or two, some are shorter.
Anime:
In Here is Greenwood (ep.4) the dorm lady has a vistor and they watch an episode of a TV drama.
In Patlabor New Files (ep.6) a TV drama is mentioned.
Manga:
In the first volume of the Kodansha bilingual edition of GTO: Great Teacher Onizuka (p.91, 109) there are two references to the TV drama San-nen B-gumi Kinpachi Sensei, however in the TOKYOPOP edition the references are not included in the translation.
Sources:
Clements, Jonathan. The Dorama Encyclopedia p,x-x1
Years of watching Japanese TV dramas on Channel 26 in the San Francisco Bay Area.

TEREBI GĒMU see; bideo gēmu

TEREHON KURABU see: terekura (telephone club)

terekura (telephone club) テレクラ
Telephone club, a contraction of terehon kurabu (テレホンクラブ). A business that charges men to pay an hourly fee to sit in a small room and wait for calls from women wanting to meet men. Women, and girls, get the numbers from ads in magazines. Telephone clubs are also a way for young women to meet men for the practice of enjo kōsai.
Manga:
A reporters notebook in IWGP: Ikebukuro West Gate Park (v.1 p.124) has the phrase telephone club crossed out.
In Voyeurs, Inc. (v.1 p. 72) two characters determine a girl they have been paid to watch is calling a terekura.
In GTO (v.16 ch.125) Miyabi is in a foul mood and calls a terekura, listens to the stranger at the other end talk for a bit and then says "Dad?"
Sources:
Schodt, Frederik. Dreamland Japan p.169-171
Sinclair, Joan. Pink Box p.23, 189
Schreiber, Mark editor. Tokyo Confidential p.81
teruteru bōzu (rain doll) 照る照る坊主 OR てるてる坊主 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.136)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.85
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1556
teshoku (portable candle holder) 手燭 (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)
Sources:
Morse, Edward. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings p.220
tesō (palmistry) 手相
Palmistry in Japan has some similarities with the European form. However it is also different. Palmistry is believed to have been introduced into Japan from China where it has been practiced for about 2,000 years. The Chinese book Shenxiang quanbian (Shen-hsiang ch'üan-pien) written around 1400 greatly influenced palmistry in Japan. Before the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) professional palm readers, many of whom were rōnin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.106), had come into existence. Today ekisha (fortune tellers) are the most common practitioners of tesō.
Manga:
In chapter 6 of Club 9 a fortune teller reads Haruo's palm and tells her about herself, he gets everything very wrong.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1186
tetsudō (railways) 鉄道 OLD FORM 鐵道 (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)
Source:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1244

TEST OF NERVE see: kimodameshi

TESTICLES see: kintama (golden balls)

TETSUBASHIRA (IRON COLUMN) see: sasumata (spear fork)

THIRD MONTH FESTIVAL see: Hina Matsuri (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)

THOSE WHO AFFIX THEIR SEAL see: rōjū (elder)

THOUSAND-ARMED KANNON see: Senju Kannon (Thousand-Armed Kannon)

THOUSAND YEAR CANDY see: chitoseame (1000 year candy)

THREE HUNDRED MILLION YEN ROBBERY see: San Oku En Jiken (300 million yen robbery)

THREE IMPERIAL REGALIA see: Sanshu no jingi (3 sacred treasures, mirror sword jewel)

THREE SACRED TREASURES see: Sanshu no jingi (3 sacred treasures, mirror sword jewel)

THROW AWAY TEMPLE see: Jōkanji

THROWING SOYBEANS see: Setsubun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.116)

THROWING STARS see: shuriken (The Anime Companion 2 p.89)

THUG see: chinpira (punk, thug)

THUNDER BRITTLE see: kaminari-okoshi (thunder brittle)

THUNDER GOD see: Raijin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.105)

TICKET, PLATFORM TICKET see: nyūjōken (platform ticket)

TIDAL WAVES see: tsunami (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)

T'IEN-T'AI see: Tendaishū (Tendai sect)

TILE, END, WITH DEMON FACE see: onigawara (The Anime Companion 2 p.69)

TILE FISH see: amadai (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)

TILES, ROOF see: kawara (The Anime Companion 2 p.43)

TIMETABLE see: jikoku-hyō (timetable)

TIT JOB see: paizuri (tit job)

Titsingh, Izaak
1744?-1812 Born in Amsterdam, he was a medical doctor when he joined the Dutch East India Company and was transferred to the Asian headquarters in Batavia Java. He went to Japan three times in 1779-80, 1781-83 and 1784. He served as Dutch trade commissioner in Nagasaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90) and visited Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) twice in official capacities. In 1809 he returned to Holland. His books are useful resources for information about life in Japan at the time he was there.
Anime:
In Samurai Champloo (ep.6 ) it was reading The Great Mirror of Male Love by Saikaku that led Titsingh to come to Japan and take an unauthorized tour of Edo.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1563

TMPD see: Keishichō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.65)

TOAD OIL see: gama no abura (The Anime Companion 2 p.22)

TOBA-FUSHIMI, BATTLE OF see: Toba-Fushimi no Tatakai (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)

Toba-Fushimi no Tatakai (Battle Of Toba-Fushimi) 鳥羽伏見の戦い OLD FORM 鳥羽伏見の戰ひ (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1564

TOBACCO STAND OR TRAY see: tabako bon (tobacco stand or tray)

TŌBU IKEBUKURO EKI see: Ikebukuro Eki (Ikebukuro station)

tobukuro (pocket door) 戸袋 OLD FORM 戶袋(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.136)
Sources:
Morse, Edward S. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings p.250 - 252
Tochigi ken 栃木県 OLD FORM 栃木縣 (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1565
Web Sites:
Tochigi Prefecture (official site)

TOCHIGI PREFECTURE see: Tochigi ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)

TŌEI MOVIELAND see: Tōei Uzumasa Eigamura (Toei Uzumasa cinema village)

TOEI SAMURAI VILLAGE see: Tōei Uzumasa Eigamura (Toei Uzumasa cinema village)

TOEI UZUMASA CINEMA VILLAGE see: Tōei Uzumasa Eigamura (Toei Uzumasa cinema village)

Tōei Uzumasa Eigamura (Toei Uzumasa cinema village) 東映太秦映画村
In the Tōei film studios in the Uzumasa area of Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) there is a section used to make jidaigeki films and terebi dorama (TV dramas). Since 1975 area has been open for tours except for parts being used for filming, even then some limited access is allowed so visitors get to see the studio in action. Visitors can also dress up in period costume, watch stunt shows, and hear lectures about history or film making. There are also various shops and restarants in the set itself. The name is commonly translated in several ways Tōei Movieland, Toei Samurai Village, Toei Uzumasa cinema village, Kyōto Studio Park and Uzumasa Movie Village are some you may see.
Manga:
Watanabe Taeko in her diary section of volume 2 of Kaze Hikaru (p.183) writes of visiting "Toei Samurai Village".
Samura Hiroaki in his "Bloodbath" journal in Ohikkoshi mentions "Movie Village" (p.238)
Sources:
Illustrated Must-See in Kyōto p.144
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1567
Kyōto-Ōsaka A Bilingual Atlas 42 E5
Toei Movie Land Guide (available as a PDF file from the official website)
Web Site:
Kyōto Studio Park Toei Uzumasa Eigamura

TŌEIZAN KANEIJI see: Kaneiji (The Anime Companion 2 p.40)

tōfu とうふ or 豆腐 (The Anime Companion 2 p.100)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.149
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.158
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1567

TŌFU BOY see: Tōfu Kozō

Tōfu Kozō 豆腐小僧
A yōkai first described in the 18th century. This yōkai has the form of a young boy, Tōfu Kozō means literally "Tōfu Apprentice" and is usually translated as "Tōfu Boy." He walks about wearing a straw hat and dressed in traditional clothing carrying a tray with a block of tōfu (The Anime Companion 2 p.100) on it decorated with a maple (see: momiji, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.58) leaf. Tradition says that some people who eat his tōfu are attacked by a fungus. Sometimes he is depicted with one eye and a long tongue much like the Hitotsume Kozō or with webbed feet. Tōfu Kozō also shows up in some kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) or puppet plays (see: bunraku, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15). There was an interesting incident in Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80), present day Kagoshima Ken, where tōfu was left in front of homes, no merchants reported unusual sales and the origin of the tōfu remained a mystery.
Manga:
In Ghost Slayers Ayashi (v.2 p.29) "Tofu Boy" leaving tōfu in front of people's doors mentioned during a meeting about meat buns mysteriously left laying about.
In Yokai Doctor (v.2 p.59) Tōfu Kozō is a major character in one story, and while he looks like a regular kid the fuzzy result of eating his tōfu shows who he is.
Sources:
Kabat, Adam. "Monsters as Edo Merchandise" Japan Quarterly vol.40 no.1 (Jan-March 2001) p.75
Mizuki Shigeru. Yōkai: Dictionnaire des Monstres Japonais v.2 p.184
Yoda Hiroko and Matt Alt. Yokai Attack! p.78

TŌFU LEES see: okara (The Anime Companion 2 p.67)

TŌFU SELLER ON BICYCLE see: tōfu-ya (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)

TŌFU SLICED THIN AND FRIED see: abura-age

tōfu-ya (tōfu seller) 豆腐屋 (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)
Sources:
Living Japanese Style p.106
Togakushi 戸隠 OLD FORM 戶隱 (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)
Sources:
Bisignani, J. D. Japan Handbook p.387-388
Web Sites:
The Togakushi Tourism Association site (in Japanese)
Togakushi Jinja 戸隠神社 OLD FORM 戶隱神社 (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)
Sources:
Bisignani, J. D. Japan Handbook p.387-388
Road Atlas Japan p.147
Web Sites:
Togakushi Jinja's site (in Japanese)

TOGAKUSHI SHRINE see: Togakushi Jinja (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)

Tōhoku Chihō 東北地方
One of the eight regions (chihō) of Japan located in the Northern portion of Honshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47). This region consists of the ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.44) of Akita, Aomori, Fukushima (The Anime Companion 2 p.22), Iwate (The Anime Companion 2 p.33), Miyagi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.86) and Yamagata. Most of the population and industry is along the Sea of Japan (Nihonkai; The Anime Companion 2 p.63) and Pacific coasts. The interior is mountainous with some basins where agriculture is practiced.
Anime:
Kintaro is transferred to the Tōhoku region in Salaryman Kintaro (ep.14)
Episode 9 of Patlabor New Files takes place here.
The Tōhoku is getting snow while Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) has a heat wave in Otogi Zoshi (ep.14)
Manga:
When Ogi gets flustered she lapses back to the Tohoku dialect in Genshiken (v.5 p.25).
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1571

TŌHOKU REGION see: Tōhoku Chihō

TOILET, JAPANESE see: benjo (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.9)

TOIRE NO HANAKO-SAN see: Hanako-san

tōji (winter solstice) 冬至
The winter solstice is one of twenty-four points (Nijūshi Sekki) on the old traditional Japanese calendar. In many agrarian societies, and Japan is no exception, this event is celebrated as the days will start getting longer. Traditional activities on this day include eating pumpkin and konnyaku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.74) paste and placing yuzu in the bath water. In rural districts this was traditionally a day off with offerings to the ancestors and workers would be treated to meals and drinks. In some areas even wedding ceremonies (see: shinzen kekkon; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) would not take place in the ten days around tōji.
Anime:
A TV announcer mentions how on the solstice her grandmother would make her take "lime juice" baths "to ward off colds" and eat "*red bean rice gruel" in Otogi Zoshi (ep.22)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1701
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.478
tōji (sake master brewer) 杜氏
A sake (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.109) brewer, the term is also pronounced toji. Technically the term applies to the overseer, or master brewer, of the brewing operation who may have several workers, called kurabito, under him. One possible origin of the term is that it may have originally applied to the houshold head's wife, a term for whom is also pronounced toji, wives would be in charge of brewing sake for the home in ancient times. The term hyakunichi otoko (100 day men) is also used to refer to tōji as in the past sake would be made in the winter months when farming was not done during a roughly 100 days period.
Manga:
In Oishinbo A la Carte: Sake (p.118) Shirō mentions resolving a dispute between the brewmaster and owners of a sake brewery.
Sources:
Frost, Griffith & John Gauntner. Saké Pure + Simple p.22
Harper, Philip. The Insider’s Guide to Saké p.113
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1572
Tōkai chihō (Tōkai Region) 東海地方 OLD FORM in book is incorrect, I am unable to display it here.(The Anime Companion 2 p.101)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1574

TOKAI REGION see: Tokai chihō (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)

Tōkaidō 東海道 OLD FORM in book is incorrect, I am unable to display it here. (The Anime Companion 2 p.101)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1573
Tōkaidō Yotsuya Kaidan (Ghost Story of Tōkaidō Yotsuya) 東海道四谷怪談
A five act sewamono (contemporary setting) kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) play by Tsuruya Nanboku IV, first performed in the seventh month of 1825 at the Nakamura-za in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18). The play goes by verious names, it is sometimes called Yotsuya Kaidan, Oiwa Inari, Mukashi Mukashi Oiwa no Kaidan, Manete Mimasu Yotsuya Kikigaki, Oiwa Inari Rishō no Tamagushi, and Katami Gusa Yotsuya Kaidan. This play is a supernatural thriller that has been so successful that it has been regularly performed to the present day. The tale is of an impoverished rōnin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.106) named Tamiya Iemon who earns his living as an umbrella maker. This tale of love, treachery, murders, and madness with a vengeful ghost wiping out two entire families. The first performances were double billed on alternate days with Kanadehon Chūshingura (Treasury of Loyal Retainers). Elements from the play which are commonly used as references to it are the ghost of Iemon's wife Oiwa, usually with her face disfigured and a lantern split open with eyes resembling Oiwa. Translations of portions of the play are available in English. Act 2 is in Traditional Japanese Theatre: An Anthology of Plays 456 - 483, Acts III and IV are in Kabuki Plays on Stage v.3 p.136-163.
Anime:
Tōkaidō Yotsuya Kaidan is available as an anime, Ayakashi Samurai Horror Tales: Yotsuya Ghost Story.
Manga:
In Astro Boy volume 9 (p.124) during a filming of Yotsuya Ghost Stories the actor playing Iemon dies on the set.
In volume 10 of Dr. Slump (p.173) there is a tableau of bakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8) and ghosts including one of the ghost of Oiwa with a disfigured face and a hitaikakushi (triangle on forehead).
Sources:
Leiter, Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.651-653
Brandon, James R. & Leiter, Samuel L. Kabuki Plays on Stage v.3 p.136-
Tōkeiji 東慶寺
Also known as Matsugaoka Gosho and Matsugaoka Tōkeiji. This temple in Kamakura (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59) was founded, with Imperial support, by Kakuzan-zenni, Hōjō Tokimune's widow in 1285. She proposed the temple be a refuge for women desiring divorce from their husbands. It continued to function as a kakekomidera (refuge temple) for most of it's history. After falling into hard times it was reorganized by Shaku Sōen as a Rinzai (Rinzaishū) Zen Buddhist (The Anime Companion 2 p.122) monastery. It is the location of the Matsugaoka Bunko, a library dedicated to the scholar D. T. Suzuki.
Manga:
In the first chapter of Yagyu Ninja Scrolls: Revenge of the Hori Clan vassals of Katō Shikibunoshō Akinari violate the sacred space of the temple.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1574
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.562

TOKIKAMA (TIME HOOK) see: sasumata (spear fork)

tokkōfuku (kamikaze party uniform) 特攻服
Sometimes translated as "kamikaze party uniform". A type of loose single colored knee length robe or long jacket worn both by redii (lady bikers) and male bōsōzoku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.14) members. Tokkōfuku are commonly decorated with an embroidered group name, slogans and emblematic art. There are shops that will make custom tokkōfuku for reasonable rates. Such clothing is worn for group activities not for everyday wear.
Manga:
In Pink Sniper (p.86) we see Yukari in her tokkōfuku with slogans on the back and sleeve.
An impressive tokkōfuku can be seen in late in GTO (v.25 ch.198)
Sources:
Macias, Patrick and Izumi Evers. Japanese Schoolgirl Inferno p.38
Sato Ikuya. Kamikaze Biker: Parody and Anomy in Affluent Japan p.38, 63-64, 67, 80-81

TOKKŌTAI see: Kamikaze Tokubetsu Kōgekitai (The Anime Companion 2 p.39)

tokkuri (sake flask) 徳利 OLD FORM 德利(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1301
Eating in Japan p.141
tokonoma (decorative alcove) 床の間 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137)
Sources:
Living Japanese Style p.20
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1575
tokoroten (gelidium jelly) ところ天 or 心太
A glassy jelly made from boiling seaweed. It is often cut into a noodle like shape and served with vinegar, depending on the region with sugar or soy sauce (see: shōyu, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.124), mustard (see: karashi, The Anime Companion 2 p.41) and occasionally garnished with grated ginger or nori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.97). This dish is a popular snack in the hot days of summer and has a tart flavor. In the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) tokoroten was sometimes freshly cut and sold right on the street.
Anime:
We see a tokoroten-tsuki used in a most dramatic way to make tokoroten sold on the street in episode 13 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi.
Tokoroten along with yuba, ganmodoki, kiritanpo and kinchaku are mentioned by Orihime as she discusses the mitarashi dango she is eating in Sakura Wars: The Movie.
Manga:
That tokoroten is eaten with sugar in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) and soy sauce or miso (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.84) in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) is mentioned in Kaze Hikaru (v.8 p.185).
Yamaoka and Yūko propose tokoroten as one of several deserts for a izakaya (The Anime Companion 2 p.33) menu in Oishinbo A la Carte: Izakaya: Pub Food (p.144).
Sources:
Condon, Jack and Camy Condon. The Simple Pleasures of Japan p.99
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.159
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.139
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.73, 207 (item)
Naito Akira. Edo: The City That Became Tokyo p.161
Sanmi Sasaki. Chado The Way of Tea: A Japanese Tea Master's Almanac p.379
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.123
tokoroten-tsuki (extruder for tokoroten) 心太突き
An extruder used to make noodle like strips from tokoroten. This consists of a oblong box shape with openings at both ends. One end has a wire grid, a large block of tokoroten is placed in the other opening and a piston in used to push it through the grid. The tokoroten-tsuki is also known as the ten-tsuki 天突き.
Anime:
We see an extruder for tokoroten used in episode 13 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi in a most dramatic way.
Sources:
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.139
Tokoyo no Kuni (Eternal Land) 常世の国
The Eternal Land, the other world. Often referred to simply as Tokoyo. Tradition has Tokoyo as a place across the ocean with great wealth populated by beneficial spirits, including those of the dead. Some descriptions see Tokoyo as being below the sea and in inland areas it came to be identified as being in the mountains.
Manga:
In Ghost Hunt (v.8 p.146) Yoshimi explains that unusual items washed up on beaches were once seen as coming from Tokoyo.
Sources:
Basic Terms of Shinto p.68
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.205
Tokugawa [family] Tokugawashi 徳川氏 OLD FORM 德川氏 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1577

TOKUGAWA ERA see: Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25)

TOKUGAWA GOVERNMENT see: bakufu (shōgunate) (The Anime Companion 2 p.8)

Tokugawa Hidetada 徳川秀忠
1579-1632. The third son of Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) and his successor as shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123). He lead some of the forces of the Tokugawa clan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) at the Battle Of Sekigahara (Sekigahara no Tatakai, The Anime Companion 2 p.81), however he missed the battle itself as he was laying siege to Ueda Castle. He also led troops in the Ōsaka no Jin (Battle of Ōsaka Castle). In 1605 he officially became shōgun, however his father continued to hold considerable power so they jointly ruled until 1616 when Ieyasu died. In 1623 Hidetada followed his father's example and retired making his son Tokugawa Iemitsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) shōgun and they jointly ruled until Hidetada died. During his rule many significant reforms were undertaken regarding control of the daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15), christianity (Kirisutokyō, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.69), and foreign contact.
Anime:
That Tokugawa Ieyasu, Hidetada and Iemitsu were all served by Tenkai is mentioned by Urabe in Otogi Zoshi (ep.18)
In Samurai Deeper Kyo Hidetada is a significant character under a pseudonym.
Manga:
That the Emperor Go-Mizunoo was forced to marry Hidetada's daughter is mentioned in Samurai Legend (Ch. 2)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1577
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.85

TOKUGAWA HIROTADA see: Matsudaira Hirotada

Tokugawa Iemitsu 徳川家光 OLD FORM 德川家光 (The Anime Companion 2 p.102)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1577
Tokugawa Iemochi 徳川家茂
1846-66. From 1858-66 Iemochi was the 14th Tokugawa shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123). He was born in Wakayama han and his name was originally Tokugawa Yoshitomi. When the 13th shōgun, Tokugawa Iesada, died without an heir a struggle for who would become the successor took place. The forces backing Tokugawa Yoshinobu (The Anime Companion 2 p.104), led by Matsudaira Yoshinaga were defeated by the conservatives led by Ii Naosuke (The Anime Companion 2 p.29) who backed Yoshitomi. Upon becoming shōgun Yoshitomi took the name of Iemochi. Iemochi's wife was princess Kazu, the daughter of Emperor Kōmei, this marriage was part of the plans of the Movement for Union of Court and Shogunate. As part of these plans Iemochi made three visits to the court in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77), on the last visit he died and was succeeded by Tokugawa Yoshinobu.
Anime:
Tokugawa Iemochi going to Kyōto is mentioned by the teacher during a lecture in Kami Chu! (ep.12)
Manga:
A reference to the shōgun who went to Kyōto in Kaze Hikaru (v.1 p.20) obviously means Tokugawa Iemochi
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1577
Tokugawa Ienari 徳川家斉
November 18, 1773–March 22, 1841. The eleventh Tokugawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123) who ruled from 1787-1837. He was the son of the daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) Tokugawa Harusada head of the Hitotsubashi Gosankyō family. As the previous shōgun Tokugawa Ieharu had no son Ienari was designated as his heir in 1781. When he became shōgun in 1787 Ienari was just thirteen years old. He was an active shōgun instituting many reforms and the country was largely prosperous due to good harvests until shortly before he retired. Ienari retired after fifty years in office and still remained active in politics unti he died in 1841. Ienari was reputed to be a bit of a self indulgent playboy with an expensive lifestyle. He was also noted for having around forty concubines and fifty five children.
Manga:
In part 2 of the Badger Hole segment of Blade of the Immortal (v.19) Hyakurin asks the upset guards of Edo Castle (see: Edojō (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) if they will be "The first to blemish the peace of Ienari-sama's reign".
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1577
Cambridge History of Japan v.5 p.51-52, 141
Seigle, Cecilia Segawa. Yoshiwara: The Glittering World of the Japanese Courtesan p.204
Tokugawa Ienobu 徳川家宣
1662-1712. Originally Ienobu was the elder son of Tokugawa Tsunashige, daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) of Kōfu han. In 1678 he took his father's place becoming the daimyo. In 1704 his uncle the shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123) Tokugawa Tsunayoshi, who was childless, adopted him as his heir. In 1708 Tsunayoshi died and Ienobu became the 6th shōgun in 1709, he ruled until 1712. During these few years he instituted several reforms, the Shōtoku no Chi, inspired by Confucian (Jukyō; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.56) principles on the advice of Arai Hakuseki his teacher and advisor. When he died his son Tokugawa Ietsugu was four and became the new shōgun.
Manga:
Tokugawa Ienobu is instructed on the strategy to keep Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80) poor in Satsuma Gishiden v.2 p.16.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p. 1578
Tokugawa Ieshige 徳川家重
1712-1761 Son of Tokugawa Yoshimune (The Anime Companion 2 p.103) and the ninth Tokugawa shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123) from 1745-1760. Yoshimune had insisted that Ieshige; who was 34, sickly, had a speech defect and was far less qualified than his two younger brothers, become shōgun. Yoshimune co-ruled as retired shōgun for the first two years of Ieshige's reign. Ieshige had little interest is being an active administrator and left much of the work to Ōoka Tadamitsu, his chamberlain.
Manga:
In Satsuma Gishiden (v.1 p.255) it is during the reign of Tokugawa Ieshige Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80) was ordered assist in the flood control work on the Kiso, Nagara and Ibi rivers.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1578
Tokugawa Ietsuna 徳川家綱
1641-80 The fourth Tokugawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123) who ruled from 1651-80. Ietsuna was the eldest son of Tokugawa Iemitsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102, he was 10 when he became shōgun and ruled with the advice of Hoshina Masayuki, Matsudaira Nobutsuna and Sakai Tadakiyo, all men who had worked under his father. Early in his rule there was a coup attempt, the Keian incident. Other noted events of the rule were a banning of following one's lord in death, encouragement of Confucian studies (Jukyō; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.56), the invitation of the priest Ingen from China and the writing of the Honchō Tsugan (Comprehensive Mirror of Our Nation's Dynasty). Being of poor health he was largely a figurehead and died without a son when he was 39. His younger brother Tokugawa Tsunayoshi then became shōgun.
Manga:
In Satsuma Gishiden (v.2 p.16) we see Ietsuna instructed on how to handle the potential danger that is Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80)
Sources:
Goedertier, Joseph M. Dictionary of Japanese History p. 210
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1578
Tokugawa Ieyasu 徳川家康 OLD FORM 德川家康 (The Anime Companion 2 p.102)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1578 - 79

TOKUGAWA KEIKI see: Tokugawa Yoshinobu (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)

Tokugawa Mitsukuni 徳川光圀 OLD FORM 德川光圀 (The Anime Companion 2 p.103)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1579
Schilling, Mark. The Encyclopedia of Japanese Pop Culture. p.135
Tokugawa Nobuyasu 徳川信康
1559-1579 The oldest son of Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102), his childhood name (yōmyō The Anime Companion 2 p.118) was Takechiyo. His early years were in Sumpu, a hostage, as were his parents, to the Imagawa family. In 1562 Ieyasu, who was living in Okazaki, dispatched Ishikawa Kazumasa to negotiate the release of Takechiyo and his mother Lady Tsukiyama in exchange for Imagawa relatives that Ieyasu held captive. In 1570, when he was eleven, Takechiyo was declared an adult by his father and given the name Nobuyasu. He had already been married for reasons of interfamily alliance to Tokuhime, the daughter of Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65) since 1567. In 1579 Tokuhime wrote her father regarding evidence that her husband and mother in law were plotting against the Oda. Accused of treason Nobuyasu was ordered to commit seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115) when he was 21.
Anime:
Tokugawa Nobuyasu and his death are mentioned in Samurai Deeper Kyo (ep.15).
Manga:
In the fourth volume of Path of the Assassin we see the infant Takechiyo with his parents and the successful negotiation to free them from being hostages.
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.85
Totman, Conrad. Tokugawa Ieyasu: Shōgun p.32, 33, 37, 41-42

TOKUGAWA PERIOD see: Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25)

TOKUGAWA SEN see: Sen Hime (Princess Sen)

Tokugawa Tsunayoshi 徳川綱吉
1646-1709 The fifth Tokugawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123) who ruled from 1680-1709. He was the third son of Tokugawa Iemitsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102). When his older brother, Tokugawa Ietsuna, died Tsunayoshi became the next shōgun. A common view is that Tsunayoshi's early advisor Hotta Masatoshi improved government finances and increased social stability and that when Masatoshi died the influence of sobayonin (grand chamberlain) Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu increased and Tsunayoshi took a less active role in running the country and became very self indulgent. In fact the opposite seems to be true with Tsunayoshi relying on Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu to apply Confucian principles and reform a government that was troubled with corruption and self indulgent officials. Tsunayoshi is also known for his "Edicts on Compassion for Living Things" (Shōrui Awaremi no Rei) which banned many types of brutal acts against the weak, especially children, and killing animals. Tsunayoshi's special interest in dogs, he was born in the year of the dog, earned him the nickname of the "dog shōgun". The famous Genroku jidai fell within Tsunayoshi's rule.
Manga:
In Satsuma Gishiden (v.2 p.16) we see Tsunayoshi instructed on how to handle the potential danger that is Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80)
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman, Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p.146
Illustrated Who’s Who of Japan p.97
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1581
Tokugawa Yorinobu 徳川頼宣 OLD FORM 德川賴宣 (The Anime Companion 2 p.103)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.777
Papinot, E. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan p. 680
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.86
Tokugawa Yoshimune 徳川吉宗 OLD FORM 德川吉宗 (The Anime Companion 2 p.103)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia (p.1581)
Frederic, Louis. Japan Encyclopedia (p. 979)
Tokugawa Yoshinobu 徳川慶喜 OLD FORM 德川慶喜 (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1581
Shiba Ryotaro. The Last Shōgun: The Life of Tokugawa Yoshinobu
Image of Tokugawa Yoshinobu

TOKUGAWA YOSHITOMI see: Tokugawa Iemochi

tokusatsu (special effects) 特撮
A contraction of the phrase tokushu satsuei, "special photography". This term is used to refer to special effects in a broad sense. It can cover realistic war films to the most imaginative science fiction. The term is also used as a genre identification to refer to programs that make regular use of special effects. One of the most internationally well known tokusatsu TV shows is Ultraman.
Anime:
Hino is introduced to Kubo as a tokusatsu, translated appropriately as special effects, and science fiction specialist in Otaku no Video 3rd animation sequence.
Sources:
Thompson, Jason. Manga: The Complete Guide p.366-368, 501.
Tōkyō 東京 (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1583-1594
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p. 149
Web sites:
Welcome to Tokyo (official government site, English section.)
Tokyo Subway Map
Administrative Districts of Tokyo Metropolis (map)
Tokyo Statistical Yearbook

For a list of the Wards (ku) of Tōkyō see: TŌKYŌ/EDO - GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURE/LOCATION - KU (WARDS) in the subject index.

TOKYO See also Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18)

TŌKYŌ BAY see: Tōkyō Wan (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)

TOKYO BIG SIGHT see: Tōkyō Kokusai Tenjijō (Tōkyō International Exhibition Center aka Tōkyō Big Sight)

TŌKYŌ BIGGU SAITO see: Tōkyō Kokusai Tenjijō (Tōkyō International Exhibition Center aka Tōkyō Big Sight)

TŌKYŌ BUDŌKAN see: Budōkan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.14)

TŌKYŌ CITY HALL see: Tōkyō Tochōsha (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139)

Tōkyō Daigaku (Tōkyō University) 東京大学 OLD FORM 東京大學 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.160
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1600
Web site:
Tōkyō Daigaku

TŌKYŌ DISNEYLAND see: Tōkyō Dizunīrando (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)

Tōkyō Dizunīrando (Tōkyō Disneyland) 東京ディズニーランド (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)
Sources:
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p.101, 493
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1595
Web site:
Tōkyō Dizunīrando

TŌKYŌ DOME see: Tōkyō Dōmu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

Tōkyō Dōmu (Tōkyō Dome) 東京ドーム (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1595

TŌKYŌ EARTHQUAKE OF 1923 see: >Kantō Daisinsai (The Anime Companion 2 p.41)

Tōkyō Eki (Tōkyō Station) 東京駅 OLD FORM 東京驛 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1599
A Look Into Tokyo p.100

TŌKYŌ INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT see Tōkyō Kokusai Kūkō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

TŌKYŌ INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION CENTER see: Tōkyō Kokusai Tenjijō (Tōkyō International Exhibition Center aka Tōkyō Big Sight)

Tōkyō Kokuritsu Hakubutsukan (Tōkyō National Museum) 東京国立博物館 (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Source:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1598
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p. 159, 161, 162-65
Tōkyō Kokusai Kūkō 東京国際空港 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.166
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1597
Living in Japan p.132
Web site:
Big Bird, the official web site: (in English)
Tōkyō Kokusai Tenjijō (Tōkyō International Exhibition Center aka Tōkyō Big Sight) 東京国際展示場
The Tōkyō International Exhibition Center also known as Tōkyō Biggu Saito (Tokyo Big Sight 東京ビッグサイト). Designed by Axs Satow Inc., construction was completed in October of 1995. Located in the Ariake neighborhood of Kōtō-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.50) in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) near the Kokusai Tenjijō Seimon train station. The building resembles four upside down pyramids, and has a total 80,000 square meters of exhibition space, a 1,000 seat conference room on the 7th floor, and two large exhibition halls, the West is five stories in height and the East is three. Among anime and manga fans this complex is famous as the location of Comic Market (Komiketto; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.73)
Anime and Manga:
Given the otaku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.103) nature of Genshiken it is no surprise that several stories involve Tokyo Big Sight. (v.1 p.126, ep3, etc).
Anime:
In the Ah! My Goddess TV series v.6 Tokyo Big Sight is hit by a meteor (ep.23)
In Full Metal Panic! (ep.12) this is where the Arbalest lands.
Manga:
Other otaku oriented manga with Tokyo Big Sight include Maniac Road (v.2 p.39) and the sequel Pretty Maniacs (v.1 p.135)
Sources:
Tokyo City Atlas 67 E5
Watanabe Hiroshi. Architecture of Tōkyō p.209-210
Web Site:
TOKYO BIG SIGHT -Tokyo International Exhibition Center

TŌKYŌ METROPOLITAN GOVERNMENT OFFICES see: Tōkyō Tochōsha (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139)

TŌKYŌ METROPOLITAN POLICE see: Keishichō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.65)

TŌKYŌ NATIONAL MUSEUM see Tōkyō Kokuritsu Hakubutsukan (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)

Tōkyō Shōken Torihikijo (Tokyo Stock Exchange) 東京証券取引所 (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p.154
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1600
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p.78
Web Sites:
Tokyo Stock Exchange

TŌKYŌ STATION see: Tōkyō Eki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

TŌKYŌ STOCK EXCHANGE see: Tōkyō Shōken torihikijo (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)

Tōkyō Tawā (Tōkyō Tower) 東京タワー (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia 1600
A Look Into Tokyo p.130-
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.113
Web site:
Tōkyō Tawa
Tōkyō Tochōsha (Tōkyō Metropolitan Government Offices) 東京都庁舎 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1597
Web site:
Tōkyō Tochōsha

TŌKYŌ TOWER see: Tōkyō Tawā (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

TŌKYŌ UNIVERSITY see: Tōkyō Daigaku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

Tōkyō Wan (Tokyo Bay) 東京湾 OLD FORM 東京灣 (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1595

TŌKYŌ WAR TRIALS see: sensō hanzai ni kansuru saiban (The Anime Companion 2 p.82)

Tomakomai 苫小牧 [市] (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1601
Bisignani, J. D. Japan Handbook p.793-794

TŌMITSU SECT (TŌJI ESOTERICISM") see: Shingonshū (Shingon sect of Buddhism)

tōmorokoshi (corn on the cob) 玉蜀黍 or とうもろこし (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.126
tonfa トンファ (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)
Sources:
Frederic, Louis. Dictionary of the Martial Arts p.238
tonkatsu (pork cutlet) とんカツ or 豚カツ (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.159
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.54-55
tonkori (Ainu stringed instrument) トンコリ
A stringed instrument with the number of strings ranging from 4 to 6. The tonkori is often used in performances of the Kamuy-yukar (songs of the gods) and religious ceremonies. The tonkori is so important in Ainu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.3) culture that the instruments themselves are considered deities. Each tonkori is custom made for the player so the sizes and designs vary, the maker places one or two pebbles in the instrument to give it a soul. The strings are played with the fingers of both hands without any pitch change.
Anime:
In Samurai Champloo (ep.17) Okuru plays a tonkori and we hear the sound of Ando Umeko sing "Pekambe Uku", "The Wheat Harvest Song", she died shortly before the episode was aired.
Sources:
Fitzhugh, William W. & Dubreuil, Chisato O. eds. Ainu: Spirit of a Northern People p.284.
de Ferranti, Hugh. Japanese Musical Instruments p.76.
Samurai Shamploo Roman Album p.58.

TOOTH BLACKING DITCH see: Ohaguro-dobu (Ditch of Black Teeth)

TOP see:
tachi (top/butch)
seme

TOP-SHELL see: sazae (turbo or top-shell)

TOPS see: koma (The Anime Companion 2 p.48)

Tora no Ana とらのあな
A major group of stores devoted to anime, manga (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.80), games and related products. The main store, the five story Comic Tora no Ana, is located on Chūō-dōri in Akihabara (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5). As the main store expanded other Tora no Ana stores were established nearby and in other Japanese cities. Tora no Ana means "Tiger Pit" and is the name of a pro wresters' training school in the Tiger Mask manga.
Anime:
In Genshiken (ep.2) Tora no Ana is seen on a map of Akihabara area and later seen inside with a visit to the 4th floor dōjinshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.23) area. Tora no Ana was actually part of the production team behind the Genshiken anime.
Sources:
Macias, Patrick and Machiyama Tomohiro. Cruising the Anime City p.22-23
Web Site:
コミックとらのあな:同人誌をはじめ萌えるアイテムが何でも揃う!

TORA-SAN MOVIES see: Otoko wa Tsurai Yo (It's Tough Being a Man, aka: The Tora-san movies)

tori no ichi (bird fair) 酉の市 (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1608
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events p.84
Look Into Tokyo p.84
Outlook on Japan p.107
Bush, Lewis Japanalia: A Concise Encyclopedia p.374

TORI NO MACHI see: tori no ichi (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)

TŌRIGARAMI (GRASPING HAND) see: sodegarami (sleeve entangler)

TORIGOE-ZA see: Nakamura-za (Nakamura Theater)

torii (shrine gate) 鳥居 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1606 and 434
Basic Terms of Shintō (1958) p.72

TORIMONO SANDŌGU see: sasumata (spear fork), sodegarami (sleeve entangler) and tsukubo (push pole)

TORO see also: ōtoro (very fatty tuna meat)

tōrō nagashi (lantern floating) 灯籠流し
A Buddhist (see: Bukkyō, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) custom at the end of the Bon (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.12) festival. Lanterns made to float with lit candles in them are placed in a stream, river or on the sea to guide the spirits of the ancestors as they depart for the land of the dead. This is a counterpoint to the custom of lighting mukaebi (welcoming fire) to welcome the spirits at the beginning of the festival. There is another type of fire used at the end of the Bon Festival on land called the okuribi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.100).
Anime:
Lanterns are set afloat at the end of episode 21 of the Kimagure Orange Road TV series, listen as Kyosuke narrates and you can hear the phrase tōrō nagashi.
Very early in the first episode of Doomed Megalopolis we see lanterns on the Sumidagawa (The Anime Companion 2 p.93) river.
Manga:
The title page of chapter 29 of Lone Wolf and Cub (v.6 p.9) shows Daigoro watching the lanterns on a river, later (p.40) we see him and his father launch a pair on the river on which are the names of two men who had died.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1608
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.271

TORUKO see: torukoburo (Turkish bath house)

torukoburo (Turkish bath house) トルコ風呂 or トルコぶろ
Literally this translates as Turkish bath. However these bathhouses existed as fronts for the ura fūzoku (illegal sex industry) with one or two girls providing service to each customer. In 1985 the Turkish scholar Nusert Sanjakli started a newspaper campaign objecting to the name with the support of the Turkish Embassy resulting in Japanese government action to outlaw torukoburo. The owners decided to simply rename their type of business and after a contest for a new name torukoburo came to be called soaplands (see: sōpurando, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.125).
Manga:
Mr. Yamano frequents a toruko in Good Bye (p.168).
A street scene in Black Jack (v.10 p.137) includes a sign that says toruko in the background.
The anonymous main character in the story "The Burden" in The Push Man (p.43) makes a living carrying a sign advertising a toruko.
In Maison Ikkoku (v.3 p.192, v.4 p.168 in the second edition) Ayako tells Godai she works at a "massage parlor", the original Japanese has toruko, in later Japanese editions this word was changed to sōpurando (soapland). Interestingly enough the same part of the story in the anime makes no mention of Ayako's occupation.
Sources:
Clements, Steven Langhorne. Tokyo Pink Guide p.63
Constantine, Peter. Japan's Sex Trade p.32-33
Sinclair, Joan. Pink Box p.189
toruko-jō (Turkish girl) トルコ嬢
In the days before torukoburo (Turkish bath house) were renamed soaplands (see: sōpurando, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.125) the women who worked in these establishments were called toruko-jō (Turkish girl). The term actually predates the origin of torukoburo as it originated with a popular masseuse known as Miss Toruko at the reputable Tokyo Onsen in 1951.
Manga:
In Good Bye the story "Click Click Click" (p.167-) opens with toruko-jō and their customers.
In Maison Ikkoku (v.3 p.192, v.4 p.168 in the second edition) where Godai thinks "So she's a..." the original Japanese says toruko-jō in later Japanese editions this word was changed to sōpu-jō. Interestingly enough the same part of the story in the anime makes no mention of Ayako's occupation.
Sources:
Constantine, Peter. Japan's Sex Trade p.33-34
Tosa han 土佐藩 (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1609
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.92
toshikoshi soba (new year's soba) 年越しそば (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)
Sources:
Experiencing Japanese Culture p.185
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1611
Look Into Japan p.89
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events p.95
Toshima-ku 豊島区
A ward of Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) bordered on the West by Nerima-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.61) and Nakano-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.60), on the South by Shinjuku-ku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.120), on the East by Bunkyō-ku, on the North by Kita-ku and Itabashi-ku 板橋区. In the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) Toshima was a village in an agricultural area on the Nakasendō (The Anime Companion 2 p.60). After WWII this area was quickly developed as a residential community with a major commercial center in Ikebukuro.
Anime:
In Otogi Zoshi episode 21 a water stoppage in Toshima-ku is reported, that the area was rural is mentioned and most of the episode takes place there.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1611
Tokyo Metropolitan Atlas p.34
Web Site:
Official site English section: Welcome to Toshima City
toshiyori (elders, community leaders) 年寄
The term means "elders", literally those who have aged. Originally it was applied to those in rural communities who were recognized as leaders. These could be elderly, officials or members of powerful families. They would lead in religious matters, economics and administration. In time similar positions developed in towns with the rise of mura-doshiyori and machi-doshiyori. In the Muromachi Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90) it came to be applied to some government officials, during the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) it was a significant title. Offices such as tairō, rōjū, karō and wakadoshiyori derived from toshiyori and people holding such offices were sometimes referred to as toshiyori.
Manga:
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.8 p.20) Hotta Kozukenosuke of Shimousa Sakura han sends a petition denouncing the corrupt toshiyori in service to the shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123).
Sources:
Goedertier, Joseph M. A Dictionary of Japanese History p.297
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1611
toso 屠蘇 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1612

TOSSING SOYBEANS see: Setsubun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.116)

TOWEL, SMALL see: oshibori (small damp towel)

TOWN COMMITTEE OR COUNCIL see: chōnaikai (neighborhood association) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.19)

TOWN ELDER see: machi-doshiyori (town elder, alderman)

TOWN MAGISTRATE OFFICE see: machi-bugyōsho (town magistrate office)

TOWNSMEN see: chōnin (townsmen)

TOY, BOBBING COW OR OX see: akabeko (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)

Tōyama no Kinsan 遠山の金さん
The popular nickname for Tōyama Saemon-no-jō, a famous Edo machi bugyō (Edo city commissioner or magistrate) from the mid 19th century. The name is also used to refer to several shows fictionalizing his work. The first such entertainment was the kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) play Tōyama Zakura Tenpō Nikki which opened at the Meiji-za theater in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) in November 1893. There have also been novels, movies and several TV dramas (see: terebi dorama) about Tōyama no Kinsan starting in 1957 and continuing with occasional series since. A famous reoccurring climactic scene in all of these is when Tōyama no Kinsan confronts the villains by exposing his shoulder which has a tattoo (see: irezumi, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50) of cherry blossoms.
Anime:
Asuma watches a TV show with the famous showing of the tattoo through an open kimono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.68) in Patlabor the TV Series (ep. 8).
A rather drunk Natsumi acts out the role with the tattoo showing at the cherry blosson viewing party (see: hanami, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39) in the You're Under Arrest Mini Specials (ep.4.4).
Tōyama no Kinsan is recast in modern times, but still with the tattoo, as Tōyama no Benbei in stories 2 "When a Virgin Steals a Man (A Tōyama no Benbei Adventure)" and 3 "When a Superior Takes Your Girl (A Tōyama no Benbei Adventure)" of Tales of Seduction.
Manga:
In a side note in Gals (v.8 p.99) mangaka (manga artist) Mihona Fujii recounts a trip to the Tōei Uzumasa Eigamura (Toei Uzumasa cinema village) in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) where she played out a role on the set of Tōyama no Kinsan.
Sources:
Clements, Jonathan. The Dorama Encyclopedia p.325-326.
Leiter, Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.662.
Papinot, E. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan p.692
Schreiber, Mark. "Jidaigeki: TV Heroes Face a New Century" Japan Quarterly; Oct-Dec 2000; 47, 4 pg.58-66.
Toyotomi Hideyori 豊臣秀頼 OLD FORM 豐臣秀賴
The son of Toyotomi Hideyoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140) and the concubine Yodogimi. Hideyori was born when his father was quite old, Hideyoshi died when Hideyori was five years old. Hideyoshi chose five of his most powerful followers to insure the safety of his son. One of the five was Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) who then consolidated his power over a period of many years. After the Sekigahara no Tatakai (Battle Of Sekigahara) (The Anime Companion 2 p.81) Hideyori became just another daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15). Conflicts arose between him and the Tokugawa family (Tokugawashi) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137) and he died in 1615 during the Ōsaka no Jin (Battle of Ōsaka Castle).
Manga:
In Vagabond (v.6 ch.56) Matahachi has a few drinks with a man who is angry about the way Tokugawa Ieyasu treats Hideyori.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1616
Toyotomi Hideyoshi 豊臣秀吉 OLD FORM 豐臣秀吉 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1617

TŌZAIYA see: chindonya (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.19)

tozama daimyō 外様大名 OLD FORM 外樣大名 (The Anime Companion 2 p.107)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1618
Craig, Albert M. Chōshū in the Meiji Restoration p.18
Papinot, E. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan p.700

TRADITIONAL CONFECTIONARY see: kashiya (traditional confectionary)

TRADITIONAL MEDICINE see: kampō (Chinese Medicine)

TRADITIONAL MEAL STYLE see: kaiseki ryōri

TRADITIONAL RESTAURANTS see: ryōtei (traditional restaurants)

TRADITIONAL STOREHOUSE, see: dozō (The Anime Companion 2 p.17)

TRAIN, PUSHERS see: oshiya (push man)

TRAIN SCHEDULE see: jikoku-hyō (timetable)

TRAIN TICKET, PLATFORM TICKET see: nyūjōken (platform ticket)

TRAIN TIMETABLE see: jikoku-hyō (timetable)

TRAINING (WARRIOR'S) PILGRIMAGE OR JOURNEY see: musha shugyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.58)

TRAINS see:

commuter trains (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.20)

Shinkansen (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.120)

Yamanote Sen (The Anime Companion 2 p.115)

TRANSPARENT VIBRATOR see: sukeruton baibu (skeleton vibe, clear vibrator)

TRAVEL PAPERS/PASS see: sekisho tegata (travel pass)

TRAVELERS GUARDIAN DEITY see: dōsojin

TRAY, FLAT FOR SERVING FOOD see: oshiki (The Anime Companion 2 p.70)

TREASURE SHIP see: takarabune (treasure ship)

TREASURY OF LOYAL RETAINERS see: Kanadehon Chūshingura

TREATY OF KANAGAWA see: Nichibei Washin Jōyaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.62)

TREATY OF PEACE AND AMITY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE EMPIRE OF JAPAN see: Nichibei Washin Jōyaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.62)

TREE, SACRED see: shinboku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.119)

TREE TO MARK DISTANCE see: ichirizuka (milestone mound)

TRIANGLE ON CORPSE OR GHOST HEAD see: hitaikakushi (triangle on forehead)

TROOPER COAT see: tokkōfuku (kamikaze party uniform)

TRUCK WITH FANCY DECORATION see: decotora (decorated truck)

TRUE PURE LAND SECT see: Jōdo-Shinshū

TS-AO-TUNG see: Sōtōshū (Sōtō sect)

tsuba (sword guard) 鍔 or 鐔 (The Anime Companion 2 p.107)
Sources:
Yumoto, John M. The Samurai Sword. p.83
tsubaki (camellia) 椿 (The Anime Companion 2 p.107)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.157
tsubame (swallow) 燕 (The Anime Companion 2 p.107)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1490
A Field Guide to the Birds of Japan p.220-221
Morse, Edward S. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings p.227

TSUBOYAKI see: sazae no tsuboyaki (sazae cooked in the shell)

TSUBUAN see an

tsuchigumo (earth spider) 土蜘蛛
The story of the tsuchigumo and Minamoto no Yorimitsu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.84) has many forms. A major one is that Yorimitsu had become ill for some time. When he was brought his medicine one evening he suddenly struck out with his sword wounding the bearer, in some tales a boy, in others a priest; who then threw sticky webs as he fled. Yorimitsu's vassal Watanabe no Tsuna followed the trail of blood to a cave by in which a wounded giant spider was found, upon the spider being killed Yorimitsu recovered. Another form of the tale has Yorimitsu dazzled by a beautiful woman until he realizes he is being enveloped by spider webs, upon cutting the woman open she turns into a spider with the bones of victims coming out of the wound along with a mass of small spiders. The (The Anime Companion 2 p.63) and kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) versions of the tale use chisuji no ito to indicate spider webs. In the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki the term is used to describe groups of people who scholars believe dwelt in caves and/or pit dwellings. These tsuchigumo had conflicts with the imperial government and were defeated in battle. Sometimes the term is Romanized as tutigumo.
Anime:
In Otogi Zoshi tsuchigumo appear twice, the first time in episode 1 as a tribe of Heian Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44) cave dwellers who are fought by Minamoto no Yorimitsu, the second in episode 14 as a bōsōzoku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.14) gang in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104).
Manga:
In Yokai Doctor (v.3 p.138) tsuchigumo are a clan of spider yōkai.
Sources:
The Kojiki: Records of Ancient Matters. trans by Basil Hall Chamberlain p.174
Kojiki. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Donald Philippi p.174
Mizuki Shigeru. Yōkai: Dictionnaire des Monstres Japonais v.2 p.188
Nihongi trans by W.G. Aston p.129, 194-195
Piggott, Juliet. Japanese Mythology p.92-4
Stevenson, John. Yoshitoshi's Strange Tales p.58, 146, 147
tsuchinoko ツチノコ or 槌の子
A yōkai with a broad snakelike body, the width of the body being greater than that of the head or tail. The tsuchinoko is said to make chirping and snore like sounds, moves by undulating up and down, can jump several meters, is poisonous and can attack. In May 2000 strange bones with a shape similar to a tsuchinoko were found in the Okayama ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.67) town of Yoshii. The news quickly spread of the find and the bones were taken to a university for study. They turned out to be those of a deformed grass snake. However Yoshii took advantage of the news to attract tourists and started making tsuchinoko brand goods such as wine and bean cakes. In 2001 the town of Mitaka in Hyōgo Ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.29) put on display what it claimed to be a captured specimen which they would later turn over to researchers to study.
Anime:
In MahoRomatic (ep.1) a TV newscast mentions that "the elusive rare animal tsuchinoko was seen today".
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Pandemonium and Parade p.1
Knight, John, "On the Extinction of the Japanese Wolf" Asian Folklore Studies, Vol. 56, No. 1 (1997), p.153
Moriguchi Kenzo, "Town touting mythical snake find; is 'rare' creature really a cash cow?" Japan Times (Saturday, June 16, 2001)
Dillon, Thomas, "Bigfoot's smaller but cuter Japanese friend" Japan Times (Saturday, April 10, 2004)
tsuitate (standing screen) 衝立 (The Anime Companion 2 p.108)
Sources:
Morse, Edward. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings p.181
tsujigiri 辻斬
"Cutting down at the crossroad" The act of killing someone at random by samurai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.110). This act of slaughtering an innocent passerby could be to test a sword, improve technique or even to take the money the victim had on them. This was a problem mainly in the early Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25). The bakufu (The Anime Companion 2 p.8) prohibited the practice and instituted patrols to increase safety. Those caught violating the law were publicly humiliated and then beheaded.
Manga:
Magatsu talks to O-Ren about possibly becoming a tsujikiri around Bancho in Blade of the Immortal: Dark Shadows Part 3
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1630
tsuka (sword hilt) 柄 (The Anime Companion 2 p.108)
Sources:
Warner, Gordon and Donn F. Draeger Japanese Swordsmanship: Technique and Practice p.55, 105
Yumoto, John M. The Samurai Sword. p.84

TSUKA-GASHIRA see: kashira (The Anime Companion 2 p.42)

Tsukahara Bokuden 塚原卜伝 OLD FORM 塚原卜傳 (The Anime Companion 2 p.108)
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. The Lone Samurai and the Martial Arts p.62-
tsukemono (pickle) つけもの or 漬物 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.161

TSUKIJI FISH MARKET see: Tsukiji Shijō (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)

Tsukiji Shijō (Tsukiji Fish Market) 築地市場 (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)
Sources:
Bestor, Theodore C. Tsukiji p.21
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p. 156
Enbutsu Sumiko. Old Tokyo p.125-126
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1631
Web Sites:
Tsukiji Shijō (Official site)

TSUKIJI WHOLESALE MARKET see: Tsukiji Shijō (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)

tsukimi (moon viewing) 月見
Moon viewing, a tradition also found in China. Especially celebrated on the night of the full moon of the 8th month known as Jūgoya from the old lunar calendar when it was the 15th night of that month. Moon viewing happens throughout the year but on Jūgoya pampas grass (see: susuki, The Anime Companion 2 p.94), sometimes with the other aki no nanakusa (see: nanakusa), are displayed, tsukimi-dango, fresh autumn fruits and vegetables as well as sweet potato (see: satsumaimo, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.111) are offered to the moon. Composing poetry, prayers for a good harvest and drinking sake (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.109) are also a traditional part of this activity. At times tsukimi parties may be seen on boats.
Anime:
In Samurai X Trust and Betrayal we see Kenshin's teacher enjoy sake while looking at the moon.
In Urusei Yatsura (ep.92 story 114) Lum enjoys Otsukimi with dango on a tray and a dried susuki arraignment.
Manga:
In Dr Slump (v.11 p.125) a tsukimi event complete with susuki, dango and drinking sake is seen.
At the end of chapter 168 in Iron Wok Jan! (v.19) Celine asks a question regarding moon watching food.
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.211
Illustrated A Look Into Japan p.87
Illustrated Japanese Family & Culture p.94
Illustrated Must See In Kyōto p.185
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1003
tsukimi (culinary term) 月見
Normally tsukimi refers to moon viewing. In a poetic turn of language it has been applied to culinary terminology where it is used to refer certain dishes with an egg (see: tamago, The Anime Companion 2 p.97) on top. Usually the term is used in the case of hot noodle (see: men rui, The Anime Companion 2 p.56) dishes with an raw egg on top, the egg cooks from the heat and the yoke resembles the roundness of the full moon. This is most often done with either soba (The Anime Companion 2 p.90) or udon (The Anime Companion 2 p.110) in a soup stock (see: dashi, The Anime Companion 2 p.15). Sometimes one sees it used with other foods such as a tsukimi burger with a fried egg.
Anime:
In the Sakura Wars TV series (ep.9) Yoneda-san orders "moon noodles" at a outdoor stall (see: yatai, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.147), in this case it is tsukimi soba served by an undercover member of the Moon Division.
Sources:
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi. World Food Japan p.121
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.162
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.92
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.36, 37 (item 61)

TSUKIMI NOODLES see: tsukimi (culinary term)

tsukimi-dango 月見団子
Simple dumplings (see: dango, The Anime Companion 2 p.15) made of rice flour which are boiled or steamed that are offered to the moon and eaten during tsukimi (moon viewing).
Anime:
Lum makes tsukimi-dango by mistake in the Urusei Yatsura OVA "I Howl at The Moon".
Sources:
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi. World Food Japan p.121
Bocking, Brian. Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.211
Illustrated Japanese Family & Culture p.94 Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1003

TSUKIMI-SOBA see: tsukimi (culinary term)

TSUKIMI-UDON see: tsukimi (culinary term)

tsukimono otoshi (exorcism) 憑物落とし (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.352
tsūkin (commuting) 通勤 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.29
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.218
Tsukiyama 築山
Lady Tsukiyama, also known as Tsukiyama Gozen, was the niece of Imagawa Yoshimoto and in 1557 became the first wife of Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) to seal the allegiance between the families. In 1559 she gave birth to a son Takechiyo who would later be called Tokugawa Nobuyasu, the following year she gave birth to a daughter, Kamehime. She and her children remained in Sumpu when Ieyasu marched as part of the Imagawa army. As a result of the defeat of the Imagawa forces at Dengakuhazama Ieyasu gained a degree of independence allying himself with Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65) and in 1562 Ieyasu's vassal Ishikawa Kazumasa negotiated the release of Lady Tsukiyama and the children in exchange for Imagawa relatives that Ieyasu held captive. In 1579 Tokuhime, Lady Tsukiyama's daughter in law, wrote her father Oda Nobunaga regarding evidence that her husband and mother in law were plotting treason. To prevent open conflict with his lord Ieyasu ordered his wife killed and son to commit seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115)
Manga:
In the first volume of Path of the Assassin (p.135) we see the marriage of Ieyasu and Tsukiyama, their relationship continues to be part of the story after that point.
Sources:
Totman, Conrad. Tokugawa Ieyasu: Shōgun p.32, 33, 37, 41-42

TSUKIYAMA GOZEN see: Tsukiyama

tsukubo (push pole) 突棒
A long pole with a T shaped end. The T and pole near it would usually be covered with spikes. This implement would be used by the police to capture suspects by pushing, tripping or pinning them against another object. A rare type had weighted chains in each end of the T. The tsukubo is one of the torimono sandōgu along with the sasumata (spear fork) and sodegarami (sleeve entangler).
Manga:
Tsukubo show up in several manga set in the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25), examples include: Lone Wolf and Cub (v.2 p.12), Samurai Executioner (v.1 p.114, 200; v.5 p.231), Blade of the Immortal (v.18 "Sparrow Net part 2), and Color of Rage (p.247).
Sources:
Cunningham, Don. Taiho-Jutsu p.93, 98-100
Tsukudajima 佃島 (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)
Sources:
Enbutsu Sumiko. Old Tokyo p. 122
Look Into Tokyo p.72
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p111-115
tsukudani つくだに or 佃煮
A type of preserve. Ingredients are simmered in soy sauce (shōyu; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.124), mirin and sugar until almost all of the liquid is gone. The ingredients used are usually vegetables or seafood cut into chunks. Tsukudani has a salty sweet quality as well as the flavor of the chosen ingredients. However the strong taste of tsukudani means that it is consumed in small quantities along with other ingredients at a meal. Tsukudani means "tsukuda simmered" refers to where the technique was developed, Tsukudajima (The Anime Companion 2 p.109) near the mouth of the Sumidagawa (The Anime Companion 2 p.93) in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18)
Manga:
In Doing Time a variety of tsukudani are part of meals throughout the book, these include: by fish tsukudani (p.46), squid tsukudani (p.46), bean and seaweed tsukudani (p.47), dry tuna and seaweed tsukudani (p.47), herring tsukudani (p.119), minnow tsukudani (p.120), and shrimp tsukudani (p.120)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.162
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.111
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1632
tsukumogami (spirit of a made object) 付喪神
There is a tradition in Japan that an old made made object will gain a spirit over time and become a bakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8). There is an otogi-zōshi story from the Muromachi Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90) entitled "Tsukumogami-ki' where this is said to be after 100 years. Some of the tales and images of tsukumogami are of neglected and abused possessions taking revenge on bad owners, other representations are of processions of objects. The most famous type scroll representation of processions is the humorous Hyakkiyagyō emaki. It is said this phenomenon can be prevented by properly disposing of such items before they are 100 years old.
Anime:
In Kami Chu! we see many tsukumogami, especially in episode 7 "Lovers of the Sun".
Tsukumogami show up more than once in the parade sequence in Pom Poko.
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Morphologies of Mystery p.10-12, 70
tsukune (meatballs) つくね (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. Dictionary of Japanese Food p.162
tsumami kanzashi (flowery hair ornament) つまみ簪
A type of kanzashi hair ornament the end of which is decorated with small flowers made of cloth. As the work is labor intensive a craftsman can only make a few simple ones a day, complex ones can take several days to assemble. It is estimated that there were about 15 craftsmen doing this work in 2002. The works are fragile as rice paste glue is used and the color can fade with prolonged exposure to light. It is not unusual for tsumami kanzashi to be handed down mother to daughter.
Anime:
In Salaryman Kintaro (ep.12) there is a flashback scene where we see a younger Misuzu dressed in a kimono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.68) with a traditional hairstyle that includes tsumami kanzashi.
Manga:
The title page of chapter 12 of Club 9 (v. 2) depicts Haruo in a kimono with her hair done up with tsumami kanzashi and biri kanzashi holding a lucky arrow (hamaya; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39).
Sources:
Illustrated A Look Into Tokyo p.39
Nakata Hiroko. "Craftsmen keep alive hair ornaments that were all the rage in Edo Period" The Japan Times: Saturday, April 27, 2002
tsuna (rope) 綱 (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)
Sources:
Thanks to Kyle T. Pope for asking about the use of tsuna in Sumo (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.127)
Buckingham, Dorothea N. Essential Guide to Sumo p.201
tsunami (tidal wave) 津波 (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1633
Frederic, Louis. Japan Encyclopedia p.1001

TSUNAYOSHI see: Tokugawa Tsunayoshi

tsunokakushi (headdress) 角隠し OLD FORM 角隱し (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1693
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.21
tsuribori (fishing ponds) 釣堀 or 釣り堀
Fishing ponds. These are artificial ponds in urban areas where one can pay some money and fish for a period of time. If you don't have your own equipment and bait you can pay a small fee to use that of the business. Most of these places are catch and release, a few will allow you to take your fish home and some give coupons for each fish caught which you can exchange for prizes or use to fish at the same place at a later date. There is even an indoor version known as hakozuri with pools set up on the floor.
Anime:
Toukairin takes some kids fishing at a tsuribori as part of their kendō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.66) training in You're Under Arrest (ep.46)
Sources:
Illustrated Living Japanese Style p.108-9
Tokyo Walking Around p.75
tsuri-dōrō (hanging lantern) 釣灯籠 OLD FORM 釣燈籠 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.878
tsuru (crane) 鶴 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.253
Condon, John and Keisuke Kurata. In Search of What's Japanese About Japan p.34

TSURUUCHI see: meigen (resounding bowstrings)

TSŪSANSHŌ see: Tsūshō Sangyō Shō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)

TSURUYA KANZABURŌ-za see: Nakamura-za (Nakamura Theater)

tsūshō 通称 FORMAL 通稱 (The Anime Companion 2 p.110)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1046
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.668
Tsūshō Sangyō Shō (Ministry of International Trade and Industry - MITI) 通商産業省 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.969
Today's Japan p.173
Tsūtenkaku (Ōsaka Tower) 通天閣 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.141)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1162
Web Sites:
Official web site in Japanese.
tsutsumotase 美人局
A scam by which a woman lures a man into a situation where he is extorted or blackmailed for money or other items. A common form is for a second man to show up claiming to be an angry relative or lover. Targets are often married or older men with a younger woman as the lure, such men are easier to intimidate. An older use, which is archaic today, refers to having sex. The word is written with three kanji for: beautiful, woman and affair.
Anime:
In Super Gals! (ep 2) Takeru threatens to breakup with Yukie unless she agrees to participate in his tsutsumotase scheme.
Manga:
in GTO The Early Years (v.3 p.79) Kaoru works an interesting variant of this con.
Sources:
Longstreet, Stephen and Ethel. Yoshiwara p.37
Schreiber, Mark. Tabloid Tokyo 2 p.60
tsuzumi
Types of drums with an hourglass shaped body and skins sewn onto iron rings at each end. The two most commonly seen types are kotsuzumi, which are played on the shoulder, and the ōtsuzumi, played on the thigh. Another type is the San no tsuzumi which is played with a drum stick. These are most commonly used in traditional performing arts such as (The Anime Companion 2 p.63), kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) and kyōgen.
Anime:
These are seen, and heard, in several anime with dancing involved such as the first episode of Gasaraki.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1636
Malm, William P. Traditional Japanese Music and Musical Instruments p.137
Outlook on Japan p.50
Wade, Bonnie C. Music in Japan p.109-110

TUB, LARGE IRON see: goemonburo (large iron pot or tub)

TUBERCULOSIS see: kekkaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.44)

TUIFA see: tonfa (The Anime Companion 2 p.105)

TUNA, VERY FATTY TUNA MEAT see: ōtoro (very fatty tuna meat)

TURBO see: sazae (turbo or top-shell)

TURKISH BATH HOUSE see: torukoburo (Turkish bath house)

TURKISH GIRL see: toruko-jō (Turkish girl)

TURNIP see: kabu (turnip)

TURNIP GREENS see: nozawana (turnip greens)

TURTLE, SNAPPING see: suppon (The Anime Companion 2 p.93)

TUTIGUMO see: tsuchigumo (earth spider)tsuchigumo (earth spider)

TV see: terebi (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

TV DRAMA see: terebi dorama
See also:
San-nen B-gumi Kinpachi Sensei
Taiga dorama (Taiga Drama)

TWELVE GUARDIANS OF YAKUSHI-NYORAI see: Juni-jinshō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.57)

TWO MOUTHED WOMAN see: futakuchi-onna (two mouthed woman)

TWO SIDED SHINTŌ see: Ryōbu Shintō (Dual Shintō)

TWO TIME BATTLE see: nikaisen (two time battle) 二回戦

TYPHOONS see: taifū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)


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Created: October 31, 1998

Updated: May 29, 2012