Anime Companion Supplement - A


Ab - Ah - Ai - Ak - Al - Am - An - Ao - Ar - As - At - Az

This series of pages is a supplement to two of my books The Anime Companion and The Anime Companion 2.

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See the regular entry pages for cross references between variant terms, differing spellings, English to Japanese terms and names:
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Special Supplement: Rurouni Kenshin OVAs

Each Supplement page consists of:
1. A list of entries in the books with page numbers.
2. New entries for items not found in the books.
3. Japanese characters for entries
4. Secondary sources used to find information for each entry.
5. Additional information for some entries.
6. Links to select Internet resources related to the entries.

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For more information about this supplement see The Anime Companion Supplement main page. Additions are announced in the Anime Companion Supplement News page and in my Blog.

Hyphenated Japanese terms are listed as single words.

The inclusion of an anime or manga title in these entries is not a recommendation of that title, see my Recommended Anime and Manga page for a list of my recommendations.


ABACUS see: soroban (The Anime Companion 2 p.91)

ABDOMEN see: hara (stomach, belly) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)

ABE NO DŌJI see: Abe no Seimei

Abe no Seimei 安倍 晴明
c921 - 1005 Abe no Seimei was a famous ommyōji of Heiankyō and is a figure we know little about other than what is written in collections of tales, legend and plays. The most famous sources of lore concerning Abe no Seimei are a commentary on the Hoki-shō, and the Abe no Seimei Monogatari. A legend dating from the early Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) has it that his mother, Kuzunoha of Shinoda Woods, was actually a kitsune (fox spirit) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.71), while his father was Abe no Yasuna. The story of his parentage is told in several plays such as the Shinodazuma Tsurigitsune Abe no Seimei (1674), the tale was also was a section of the famous five part bunraku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) play Ashiya Dōman Ōuchi Kagami (1734) which was quickly adapted for the kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) stage. The Lady Kuzunoha portion of the play is available in English in Kabuki Plays on Stage v.2 Villainy and Vengeance: 1770-1800. The play tells how his childhood name (yōmyō The Anime Companion 2 p.118) Abe no Dōji, was changed to Abe no Seimei. Tales of Abe no Seimei have also been written in recent fiction and movies.
Anime:
Abeno Donmei is the 16th descendant of Seimei Abeno in Haunted Junction (ep 7)
In Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi he makes an interesting appearance (ep.9)
Abeno Seimei (transliterated as Seimei Abe) is said to have been born in Ryujin village in Wakayama ken in Doomed Megalopolis (ep.2 )
In Otogi Zoshi Abe no Seimei plays a major role from the first episode.
Sources:
Dougill, John. Kyōto: A Cultural History p.18-19
Goff, Janet E. "Conjuring Kuzunoha from the World of Abe no Seimei" in: Leiter, Samuel L. A Kabuki Reader p.269-283
Papinot, E. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan p.2
Smyers, Karen A. Fox and the Jewel p.104, 232 note 18.
abekawamochi あべかわもち or 安倍川餅
Mochi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.87) cut, usually into oblong rectangles, and grilled. Often kinako (soybean flour) sweetened with sugar is sprinkled on top or the mochi is moistened and dipped in the mixture, sometimes syrup and kinako are used. The Abekawa part of the name refers to a river in present day Shizuoka ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.86)
Manga:
The prisoners discuss abekawamochi among the other foods they expect to be treated to during the New Year season in Doing Time (p.120)
Sources:
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.70
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.19
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.138
Sen Tomiko. An Almanac of Urasenke Seasonal Tea Sweets p.22, 74

ABSENT FATHER see: tanshin funin (absent father)

ABSTINENCE see: tachimono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.129)

abura-age (fried tōfu sliced thin) あぶらあげ or 油揚げ
Tōfu (The Anime Companion 2 p.100) thinly sliced and fried in oil. This may be used by itself in a dish as kitsune udon or kitsune soba, or with one end opened and stuffed as in inarizushi. A tradition of uncertain origins says abura-age is a favorite food of foxes (kitsune, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.71) and is often left at shrines (see: jinja, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.54) to Inari (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.48) as offerings.
Anime:
In Urusei Yatsura (ep.99) we see fried vegetables (kara-age), fried prawn, fried tōfu (abura-age), fried dough (kakiage), raw eggs (tamago; The Anime Companion 2 p.97) and meat (niku) in a serving of soba (The Anime Companion 2 p.90)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.19
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.91, 149
Smyers, Karen A. The Fox and the Jewel p.96

ACUPUNCTURE see: hari (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)

ADACHI WARD see: Adachi Ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)

Adachigahara 安達ヶ原 (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)
Sources:
Kusano Eisaburo. Stories Behind Noh and Kabuki Plays p.44-46
Adachi-ku 足立区 OLD FORM 足立區 (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.6
Waley, Paul. Tokyo: City of Stories p. 22
Tokyo Metropolitan Atlas p. 44-45
Web Sites:
Adachi (official site)

ADDRESS see: atena (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)

ADMINISTRATIVE REPRESENTATIVES see: daikan (The Anime Companion 2 p.15)

ADOPTION see: yōshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.148)

ADULT VIDEO (AV) see: AV (Adult Video)

aemono あえもの or 和え物
A simple salad made with cooked vegetables. A thick dressing is used, usually made with ground sesame seeds with a little sugar and soy sauce (shōyu; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.124). Sometimes dressings made with miso (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.84) or tōfu (The Anime Companion 2 p.100) are used.
Manga:
Aemono is one of the dishes made by Kiriko in a cooking competition in Iron Wok Jan! (v.22 ch.203)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.19

AGAR-AGAR see: kanten (The Anime Companion 2 p.41)

AGAR-AGAR STRIPS see: tokoroten (gelidium jelly)

AGEKAMABOKO see: satsuma-age

AGE OF WARRING STATES see: Sengoku jidai (Warring States Period) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.113)

ageya (rendezvous teahouses) 揚屋
Teahouses where high ranking courtesans, tayū and koshi, would meet with their customers. They would arrive in a slow, elegant procession with attendants and equipment showing the woman's status. Ageya were not brothels but houses were entertainment took place that would send for the courtesans to join the client. To become a client of an agaya usually required a letter of introduction, it was not a place where one could just walk in and be served. Some ageya had gardens and impressive decor, though the Yoshiwara ones were said to not be as impressive as the ones in the Shinmachi area of Ōsaka (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.102). Over time as the number of skilled courtesans worthy of the higher ranks declined so did the ageya. In the mid 17th century there were 36 ageya in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18), by the mid 18th century there were none. It is not unusual to see cases where agaya is mistranslated as "brothel."
Manga:
Kondō Isami (The Anime Companion 2 p.49) has made arraingements to take Shinsengumi (The Anime Companion 2 p.86) members to an ageya in Ōsaka's Shinmachi area in Kaze Hikaru (v.17 p.152).
Sources:
Nishiyama Matsunosuke. Edo culture p.269 Pate, Alen Scott. Ningyō: The Art of the Japanese Doll p.182
Seigle, Cecilia Segawa. Yoshiwara p.34, 64, 77, 88, 273
Waley, Paul. Tokyo: City of Stories p.146-47

AGGRESSIVE TOP see: kyō-seme

aging population (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.3)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.53

AHŌ ODORI see: Awa odori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)

Aichi Ken 愛知県 OLD FORM 愛知縣 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.3)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.20
Web site:
NETAICHI (official site)
aidoru ("idol" singer) アイドル (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.3)
Sources:
"Idol Chatter." Animerica vol. 5 #2 pages 8-9
Oshiguchi, Takashi. "On Idols and Anime." Animerica vol. 5 #2 page 61
Clements, Jonathan. "Japan Rocks." Anime UK New Series vol 1, number 3 (New Series Issue 3) May 1995 pages 12-13.
aikidō 合気道 OLD FORM 合氣道 (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.20
Frederic, Louis. Dictionary of the Martial Arts p.3-5
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p.10-11
Martial Arts & Sports in Japan p. 150
Ainu アイヌ (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.3)
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.21-22

AINU STRINGED INSTRUMENT see: tonkori (Ainu stringed instrument)

AIR RAID HOOD see: bōkū-zukin bōkū-zukin (anti-air raid hood)

AIRCRAFT see:
Betty (aircraft) (The Anime Companion 2 p.9)
Emily (aircraft) (The Anime Companion 2 p.19)
Ōka (Ohka, aircraft) (The Anime Companion 2 p.67)
Zerosen (aircraft) (The Anime Companion 2 p.122)

AIR SELF DEFENSE FORCE see: Jieitai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.53)

AIZU BASIN see: Aizu Bonchi (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)

Aizu Bonchi (Aizu Basin) 会津盆地 OLD FORM 會津盆地 (The Anime Companion 2 p.3)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.24

AIZU FIEF see: Aizu han (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)

Aizu han 会津藩 OLD FORM 會津藩 (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.24
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.34, 241
aji (saurel, horse mackerel)
A common type of fish, over 40 species are found in Japanese waters. Aji is usually translated as jack, saurel or horse mackerel. When cooked it has a mild smell, salt grilling (shioyaki) and batter frying (furai) are two common ways to prepare it. Is is also served as sashimi (The Anime Companion 2 p.79), in sunomono and nitsuke as well as being used in other dishes.
Anime:
Aoi buys mackerel, aji is the word spoken, in Ai Yori Aoshi (ep. 2)
Kurama is served deep fried saurel in Urusei Yatsura (ep. 48 story 71).
One saurel meal is ordered in Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi (ep.7).
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.20
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.105
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.24
ajisai あじさい or 紫陽花 (Japanese hydrangea) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.578
aka to shiro (red and white) あかとしろ or 赤と白 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.63
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japanese Etiquette Today p.90
akabeko (bobbing ox toy) 赤べこ (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)
Sources:
Japanese Inn and Travel p.127
aka-chōchin (red lantern) あかちょうちん or 赤提灯 OLD FORM 赤提燈 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.16
akafuku 赤福
A confection made by spreading bean jam on top of small mochi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.87). These are a traditional sweet of Ise in Mie ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.56)
Anime:
Akafuku is eaten by an engineer while doing tests on the tachikoma in Ghost in the Shell S.A.C. 2nd GIG (ep.15) One of the tachikoma makes a pun involving sweet akafuku being eaten by a sweet man wearing a aka fuku (red uniform)
Sources:
Japanese Inn & Travel p. 134
Akagawa Jirō 赤川次郎 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.25
akagai あかがい or 赤貝 (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)
Sources:
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan 39, 40. 68 (image)
Eating in Japan p.25
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.20
akai-kami-aoi-kami (red paper blue paper) 赤紙青紙
A question posed by a type of restroom yōkai. Akai-kami-aoi-kami can be translated directly as "red paper blue paper" but in this context the phrase means more like "do you want red toilet paper or blue toilet paper?" To answer red means a bloody death, to answer blue means to have all the blood drained out of the body. To ask for anything else also means death.
Anime:
In episode 8 of Haunted Junction the choice is between a red and a blue hanten (short coat). Choosing blue gets you a punch which results in a blue mark, also pronounced "hanten".
Sources:
Yoda Hiroko and Matt Alt. Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide p.164
akamanto (red mantle) 赤マント
Usually translated as red mantle or red cape. This is a yōkai that haunts toilets and asks people if they want an aka (red) manto. If they say yes the skin on their backs is torn off.
Anime:
In the Urusei Yatsura TV series (ep. 37) a school legend of the red mantle kidnapping a beauty years earlier is recounted, then he returns.
In thefirst episode of Haunted Junction a group of girls come out of the restroom swooning. In Haunted Junction the Red Mantle is quite a beauty himself, notice what one of the girls is doing on the floor as she lays there.
Sources:
Yoda Hiroko and Matt Alt. Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide p.164
Akasaka 赤坂 (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p. 22
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.26
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p. 14
Waley, Paul. Tokyo: City of Stories p. 218-
Akashi 明石 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.26
Web Site:
明石市ホームページ - Foreigners

akebi 木通 or 通草
Akebia quinata. Native to Honshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47), Shikoku (The Anime Companion 2 p.84) and Kyūshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.78) as well as parts of China and Korea this vine produces an edible fruit that is shaped like a huge pea pod, is purple on the outside with a white flesh containing black seeds. It ripens in the fall and has a rather bland flavor, however at times it can be sweet. The plant is now also grown in the United States and Europe. You are more likely to see this plant in the wild rather than in stores. There is a trifoilate variety, mitsuba akebi, the vines of which are used in traditional crafts.
Anime:
In Pom Poko there is more than one scene where tanuki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.133) gather akebi.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.21
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.27
Akechi Mitsuhide 明智光秀
1526-82 Sometimes called Koretō Hyūga no Kami. A warrior who in 1566 became a vassal of Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65). He took Yakami castle from Hatano Hideharu in 1579 by holding Hideharu's mother hostage, she was then crucified by Nobunaga. However Mitsuhide's own mother was killed by Hatano vassals in retaliation. He held positions in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) for Nobunaga and was awarded Sakamoto castle and lands as a reward for his service. In 1582 he revolted and led his forces against Honnōji temple where Nobunaga was staying. After Nobunaga's death he attempted to centralize power in his hands but was defeated 11 days later in the Battle of Yamazaki by Toyotomi Hideyoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)
Anime:
Akechi Mitsuhide's betrayal is mentioned in episode 17 of Samurai Deeper Kyo.
Akechi Mitsuhide's attack on Nobunaga, and later Mitsuhide's death is seen in Wrath of the Ninja: The Yotoden Movie
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.27
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.27

AKI NO NANAKUSA see: nanakusa (seven herbs)

AKIBA see: Akihabara (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)

Akihabara 秋葉原 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.27
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.10
A Look Into Tokyo p.163
Web site:
Welcome to Akihabara
Akihabara Eki (Akihabara Station) 秋葉原駅 OLD FORM 秋葉原驛 (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)
Sources:
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p.136
Tokyo Metropolitan Area Rail & Road Atlas p.34

AKIHABARA STATION see: Akihabara Eki (The Anime Companion 2 p.4)

Akita Ken 秋田県
Akita Prefecture, located in Northern Honshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47) on the Nihonkai (The Anime Companion 2 p.63) coast, South of Aomori Ken, West of Iwate Ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.33) and North of Miyagi Ken (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.86) and Yamagata ken. Before the Meiji Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81) what is now Akita Ken was partly in the provinces of Mutsu no Kuni and Dewa. Akita Ken is mainly composed of mountains notably the Dewa mountains and Ōu mountains. In the winter snow commonly reaches 5 feet in many areas. The area is poorly developed due to the difficulty of transporting goods out of such a mountainous area. The economy is based on rice cultivation and forestry, there is also a pulp and plywood industry. Copper, gold and other metals are mined and some petroleum is extracted. Sake (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.109) production and tourism also bring in some revenue to the area.
Anime and Manga:
In GTO (ep.2 ; vol. 2 p.90) Onizuka is on the road with a truck heading towards Akita ken.
Anime:
In episode six of Ghost in the Shell S.A.C. 2nd GIG Ruriko Asagi is from Akita.
In Blue Seed (ep. 26) we get a glimpse of a scene in Akita with a dramatic display of lanterns.
Manga:
In the opening chapter of Club 9 we see a winter scene in Akita ken. Later we see several scenes of the folks Haruo left back home when she went off to school in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.29
Web Site:
美の国あきたネット
[Information in English section]

AKŌ INCIDENT see: Akō Jiken

Akō Jiken (Akō incident) 赤穂事件
On the 15th day of the 12th month of the 15th year of the Genroku jidai (January 31, 1703) a band of rōnin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.106) attacked the home of Kira Yoshinaka, fought his bodyguards, and killed him to avenge the death of their lord. The reason for this was that two years earlier Kira, the chief of protocol for the shōgun (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.123), had severely insulted Asano Naganori the daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) of Akō who was in charge of the New Year's reception in Edo Castle (Edojō; The Anime Companion 2 p.18) for visiting nobles from Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). Asano drew his sword and attacked Kira, who is sometimes refered to as Kira Kōzukenosuke, wounding him slightly on the face. The attack was an extreme breach of regulations and Asano was sentenced to commit seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115) and his han (The Anime Companion 2 p.26) was confiscated. A group of samurai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.110), who now were rōnin, under the leadership of Ōishi Kuranosuke agreed to avenge their lord. Ōishi delayed attacking Kira in the hope that the clan would have the han restored to it. After some this failed the plan to kill Kira was carried out. After killing Kira the 46 rōnin, one had dropped out at the last minute, washed the head and carried it to their lord's grave at Sengakuji, they then surrendered to the authorities. The shōgun himself adjudicated the case and eventually the rōnin were ordered to commit seppuku. Their actions quickly gained them great admiration for loyalty and self sacrifice. Their graves are at Sengakuji and incense left by visitors constantly burns there. In 1748 a famous play based on the incident, Kanadehon Chūshingura (Chūshingura: The Treasury of Loyal Retainers) was first performed, many other plays and movies were based on this play and the events that inspired it.
Manga:
A bounty hunter mentions the forty seven rōnin while discussing uses of drums in Lone Wolf and Cub (v.5 p.68)
In volume one of Kaze Hikaru the Ako-rōshi (p.145) and rōshi of Akō (p.125) are mentioned when discussing the color of the Shinsengumi (The Anime Companion 2 p.86), uniform.
Sources:
Cybriwsky, Roman. Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p.54
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.404
Illustrated Who’s Who of Japan p.105
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then: An Explorer's Guide p.398-400

AKO-RŌSHI see: Akō Jiken (Akō incident)

akushu suru (shaking hands) 握手する (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japanese Etiquette Today p.17

AKUTAGAWA PRIZE see: Akutagawa Shō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)

Akutagawa Ryūnosuke 芥川竜之介 FORMAL 芥川龍之介 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.30
Akutagawa Shō 芥川賞 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.30

ALARM BELL see: hanshō (fire alarm bell)

ALCOVE see: tokonoma (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137)

ALDERMEN see: machi-doshiyori (town elder, alderman)

ALTAR ON WALL see: kamidana (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.60)

ALTAR, FAMILY, BUDDHIST see: butsudan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.16)

ALTAR, FAMILY, SHINTŌ see: kamidana (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.60)

ALTAR, MEMORIAL, BUDDHIST see: butsudan (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.16)

ALTERNATIVE ATTENDANCE see: sankin kōtai (The Anime Companion 2 p.77)

amadai あまだい or 甘鯛 (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. Dictionary of Japanese Food p.21
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi. World Food Japan p.47, 253
amado (rain doors) あまど 雨戸 OLD FORM 雨戶(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Living in Japan p.36
Morse, Edward S. Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings p.247-250
amakudari (descent from heaven) 天下り
A term that literally means descent from heaven. This term is used to refer to when a bureaucrat retires and takes a position in a private enterprise related to his former job. In Japan government employees have to retire in their late 40s or by 55 and pensions for government employees are not large. Some find employment in the private sector and then use their connections with their previous coworkers to obtain information and contracts.
Anime:
In the Salaryman Kintaro series Oshima, the president of Yamato Construction, is a retired bureaucrat whose heavy handed actions cause friction within the company.
In Planetes (ep.8) the managing director hires a retiring inspector from INTO which means the division manager, Dorf, has to agree to the hire.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.33
Amakusa Shirō 天草四郎 (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1368
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.29

AMAKUSA UPRISING see: Shimabara no Ran (The Anime Companion 2 p.84)

amanattō (sweetened beans) 甘納豆
Any of several types of whole beans and peas cooked by boiling with sugar. Fine sugar is then sprinkled on top to make a coating. Azuki is one of the types of beans used to make this, others commonly include endō-mame and ingen-mamae.
Manga:
In Doing Time amanattō is mentioned when discussing breakfast (p.82) and later (p.125) listed as one of the sweets given to the prisoners at the New Year.
Sources:
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.134
Amaterasu Ōmikami 天照大神 OLD FORM 天照大神 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.34, 1028
amazake あまざけ or 甘酒 or 醴
A drink made from a mixture of water, cooked rice and kōji. Often amazake is translated as "sweet sake". The mixture is kept at 50-60 degrees Centigrade for 12 - 24 hours. Then it is sweetened and sometimes also has ginger added for flavor. It is served hot and is usually drunk in cold weather sometimes as a treatment for colds and sore throats.
Anime:
In Maison Ikkoku (ep.50) Kyoko offers "sweet sake" she has made to Godai and Mitsukoshi.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.21
ame-tsuchi (Heaven and Earth) 天地
Heaven and earth. A phrase used in a Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) teaching that says that at the time of creation the pure and light parts of the world became heaven and the turbid and heavy became the earth. Ame, heaven, became the place where the amatsukami, the heavenly kami (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59) dwelt. Tsuchi was where the kami of the land, the kunitsukami dwelt. The amatsukami then descended to pacify the earth thereby integrating the elements of both in this world.
Anime:
The ancient gods of "Ametsuchi" are mentioned by Inugami as he speaks to the Emperor in Phoenix (ep.10).
Sources:
Basic Terms of Shinto (revised edition) p.2
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.5
Amida 阿弥陀
Also refered to as Amida Butsu and Amida Nyorai. The Sanskrit for Amida is said to stand for Amitabha (boundless light, JP: Muryōkō) and Amitayus (boundless life, JP: Muryōju) and the name of this Buddha is usually translated as Buddha of Infinite Light and Life. He is also referred to as Buddha of Compassion and Wisdom. Tradition has him as a king who renounced his rank to become a wandering monk, over several incarnations he fulfilled 48 vows he had taken and became a bodhisattva (see: bosatsu, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.13). Amida rules over the Pure Land in the West (see: Gokuraku, The Anime Companion 2 p.24). Amida is a popular Buddha in Mahayana Buddhism (see: Bukkyō, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) being mentioned in over 200 sutras. In Japan he is venerated in most traditions and is the main deity of the Pure Land sects such as Jōdoshū (Jōdo sect) and Jōdo-Shinshū. He is also one of the 13 Buddhas especially venerated in Shingonshū (Shingon sect of Buddhism). In art he is almost always depicted as seated in a lotus position, when depicted standing he has a large halo from his feet to a point over his head. The practice of nenbutsu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.92) involves the recitation of his name.
Manga:
The monk Kūsei tells the peasants that their connection to Amida Nyorai is more important that to their lord Matsudaira Ieyasu (see: Tokugawa Ieyasu, The Anime Companion 2 p.102) ) in Path of the Assassin (v.6 p.62).
Sources:
Arai Yūsei. Shingon Esoteric Buddhism p,63-64
Frederic, Louis. Buddhism: Flammarion Iconographic Guides p.134-145
Inagaki Hisao. A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms p.5
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.34-35
Matsunami Kodo. Essentials of Buddhist Images p.38-42

AMIDA BUDDHA see: Amida

AMIDA BUTSU see: Amida

AMIDA NYORAI see: Amida

AMITABHA BUDDHA see: Amida

AMOGHAPASHA BODHISATTVA see: Fukūkenjaku Kannon Bosatsu

am/pm
The Japanese branch of the BP owned konbini (convenience store) chain was purchased by Japan based Rex Holdings (then named Reins International) in 2004. Due to declining revenue Rex Holdings decided to sell the chain in 2008 and in February 2009 started negotiations with LAWSON, INC. which eventually did not lead to a deal. In December 2009 rival chain FamilyMart purchased am/pm Japan for about ¥12 billion giving FamilyMart a rough total of 8,700 stores in Japan. At the time of the purchase am/pm had about 500 stores in the 23 ku area of Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) alone.
Anime:
In episode 1 of Ah! My Goddess Flights of Fancy we see that Belldandy works in a "AN PN" convenience store.
Sources:
"Rex Holdings eyeing sale of am/pm Japan" The Nikkei Weekly (Japan) Tuesday, September 16, 2008
Mizuno Yuji. "Reins founder never stops growing" The Nikkei Weekly (Japan) Monday, November 1, 2004
"FamilyMart, Itochu close to am/pm deal" The Japan Times: Friday, Nov. 13, 2009
"FamilyMart acquires am/pm Japan" The Japan Times: Wednesday, Dec. 30, 2009
"Lawson looks to buy am/pm for ¥15 billion" The Japan Times: Thursday, Feb. 26, 2009
Web Site:
am/pm|FamilyMart
an あん or 餡
A thick sweet paste usually made of sugar and pulses. The main use for an is as a filling for wagashi (traditional confections) and to make other sweet snacks such as anpan (The Anime Companion 2 p.5) and yōkan (The Anime Companion 2 p.117). White an, called shiroan, is made from white kidney beans, azuki is used to make red an, the most common type, which comes in two forms koshian, which is smooth, and tsubuan, which is chunky. An is also sometimes made from chestnuts, potatoes, lily roots, and sweet potato (satsumaimo; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.111)
Manga:
In Doing Time (p.125) an is one of the sweets given to the prisoners during the New Year.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.22
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.129
Sen Tomiko. An Almanac of Urasenke Seasonal Tea Sweets p.121

ANCHOVIES, SMALL DRIED see: niboshi (small dried fish)

ankō (angler fish) あんこう or 鮟鱇 (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.34, 107
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.22
anman (sweet filled bun) あんまん or 餡まん
A Chinese style steamed bun made of wheat flour filled with an.
Anime:
Yamada's Nikuman and Anman Dumplings is printed on a bag that Jigoro eats from in Yawara! (ep 1).
Sources:
Nagasawa Kimiko & Camy Condon. Eating Cheap in Japan p.62, 156 (item)
anmitsu あんみつ or 餡蜜 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.6)
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.137

ANNIVERSARIES OF DEATHS see: meinichi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81)

ANNUAL EVENTS see: matsuri to nenchū gyōji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81)

anpan あんパン or あんぱん or 餡麪包 (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)
Sources:
Krouse, Carolyn R. A Guide to Food Buying in Japan p.46-47

ANSEI CRACKDOWN see: Ansei no Taigoku (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)

ANSEI EARTHQUAKE see: Ansei Edo Jishin (Ansei Edo Earthquake)

Ansei Edo Jishin (Ansei Edo Earthquake) 安政江戸地震
A major earthquake that hit the Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) area on Nov 11 of 1855 (the 2nd day of the 10th month of the 2nd year of Ansei), also known as the Great Ippo Earthquake. The epicenter was under the city and had an estimated 6.9 magnitude on the Japanese scale. Shitamachi was the hardest hit with about 20% of the population losing their homes. There were about 6,000 dead, two thirds of which were in shitamachi. Due to a lack of strong winds there was little fire damage.
Manga:
Sei tells the story of meeting Matsumoto Hogen not long after the Great Ippo Earthquake in Kaze Hikaru (v.15 p.46).
Sources:
Historical Dictionary of Tokyo p.23
Correspondence with Ono-san in Tōkyō to verify that the Great Ippo Earthquake is in fact the Ansei Edo Jishin and on the differences between the Japanese calendar of the time and the Western calendar.
Ansei no Taigoku (Ansei Purge) 安政の大獄 (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.41

ANSEI PURGE see: Ansei no Taigoku (The Anime Companion 2 p.5)

ANTENNA HAIR see: shokkaku (antenna)

ANTI-AIR RAID HOOD see: bōkū-zukin (anti-air raid hood)

ANTI-CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS INQUISITION see: shūmon aratame (religious inquisition)

ANTI-CHRISTIAN "TREADING ON ICONS" see: fumie (picture to step on)

Aomori Ken 青森県
Aomori Prefecture. The Northernmost ken of Honshū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47) just south of the Tsugaru Strait, to the west is the Nihonkai (The Anime Companion 2 p.63), to the East is the Pacific Ocean and South are Akita Ken and Iwate Ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.33). The Dewa mountains and Ōu mountains reach into the central and Western parts of Aomori Ken. The Eastern portion is relatively level and has less snow than the West. The volcano Osorezan is on the Shimokita peninsula. The Western portion of the Ken formed the Tsugaru and the Eastern the Nambu districts of Mutsu no Kuni. These two were merged in 1871 to form the Ken of Hirosaki, later it was renamed Aomori Ken. Aomori is connected to Hokkaido (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.46) by the Seikan Tunnel. The economy is based on fishing, farming and forestry. Modern crops include apples and dairy cattle. There is a tourism trade with the Nebuta Festival (Nebuta Matsuri; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.92) drawing tourists from many parts of Japan as well as hot springs.
Anime and Manga:
Onizuka is driving a truck about 80km from Aomori in GTO (v.2 p.91 & ep.2)
Anime:
Aomori is the location of an old school in Haunted Junction (ep 4)
Manga:
The stories "The Ijinkanmura Murders" (v.2) and "Playing the Fool" (v.12) in The New Kindaichi Files take place mainly in Aomori ken.
"Product of Aomori Prefecture" is on a box of apples in Voyeurs, Inc. (v.3 p.17)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.44
Web Site:
Aomori Navigator
Aoto-zōshi hana no nishiki 青砥稿花紅彩画
A famous kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) play by Kawatake Mokuami. The play is also known as Shiranami Gonin Otoko, Benten Kozō, Benten Musume Meono Shiranami, Enoshima Sodachi Neoi no Chigokiku, Ōto no Kiku Benten Kōzo, and in English as Bentin the Thief. The play was first performed in 1862 and deals with the cross dressing thief Bentin Kozō Kikunosuke and the five member gang he is associated with. Famous scenes include the extortion of money from a merchant after Bentin has been exposed as being a man, the self introductions of the members of the gang in their new clothing on a riverbank and a battle between the police and Bentin on the roof of a temple which later rises to become the gate of the temple complex in a scene that is also an homage to Sanmon Gosan no Kiri (The Anime Companion 2 p.78), the first kabuki play about the famous thief Ishikawa Goemon (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.51). The play is available a regionless on DVD from Shochiku Home Video under the title of Shiranami Gonin Otoko and part of the script is in the book The Art of Kabuki: Five Famous Plays.
Anime:
In the Lupin the 3rd: From Moscow With Love (TV 11) two part story "Kooky Kabuki" Lupin's adversaries are modeled on the gang of this play.
In Sailor Moon R (ep.56) Mars, Jupiter, Mercury and Venus introduce themselves on a stage in the style of the famous introduction seen in the play.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.44
Leiter, Samuel L. The Art of Kabuki: Five Famous Plays p.1-58
Leiter, Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.16-18
Herwig, Arendie & Henk. Heroes of the Kabuki Stage 313-317
Web Site:
DVD info for Shiranami Gonin Otoko
For the SHV web site on their release
CD Japan entry on the same DVD.
Aoyama 青山 OLD FORM 靑山 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.6)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.134, 142
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.45

AOYAMA CEMETERY see: Aoyama Reien (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.6)

Aoyama Reien (Aoyama Cemetery) 青山霊園 OLD FORM 靑山靈園 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.6)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.143

APARTMENT, EDO PERIOD STYLE see: nagaya (The Anime Companion 2 p.59)

APARTMENT BLOCKS see: danchi (housing complex)

APPRENTICE GEISHA see: maiko (apprentice geisha) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.78)

APRICOT see: ume (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.143)

ARAGAMI see: Susanoo-no-Mikoto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.127)

Arai-chō 新居町 (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.46
Web Sites:
Arai-chō (Official site)
Arakawa 荒川
A river that flows from the Kantō Mountains in Saitama ken through the Kantō Plain where it enters Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) flowing through Adachi-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.3), then the borders of Sumida-ku, Katsushika-ku, Kōtō-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.50) and Edogawa-ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) finally emptying into Tōkyō Bay (see: Tōkyō Wan, The Anime Companion 2 p.105). Until the early 20th Century starting at the point where the Arakawa flowed into Tōkyō the name of the river would change to the Sumidagawa (The Anime Companion 2 p.93). These days the Arakawa continues to flow in the form of the Arakawa Canal in Tōkyō which leads to Tōkyō Bay between Kōtō-ku and Edogawa-ku. The canal was a project of the national government begun after the great floods of 1910 under the supervision of the Home Ministry and built through areas with a low population. This canal was built to take the excess water from the river during periods of heavy rain by splitting the river in two. Where the Arakawa splits from the Sumidagawa large sluice gates are used to control the flow and divide it. The construction of the canal ended in 1930.
Anime:
The most obvious anime series related to this river is Arakawa Under the Bridge.
In episode 11 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi several rivers: the Tomegawa, Edogawa, Arakawa, and Ōkawa (aka Sumidagawa) are all mentioned during the discussion on the banks of the Tomegawa.
Manga:
An incident which leaves many dead and wounded takes place near the Arakawa estuary in chapter 214 of Rurouni Kenshin (v.24 p.148).
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.46
Seidensticker, Edward. Low City, High City p.263
Tokyo City Atlas p.42, 50-52, 60, 68
Waley, Paul. Tokyo Now & Then p.226
Arakawa-Ku 荒川区 OLD FORM 荒川區 (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopediap.46
Web site:
Arakawa (official site)

ARAKAWA WARD see: Arakawa Ku (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)

Arashiyama 嵐山 (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.47
Must See In Kyōto p.152
Rowthorn, Chris and Mason Florence. Kyōto p.141

ARCADE GAME see: bideo gēmu

ARCHERY see: kyūdō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77)

Arima Kihei 有馬喜兵衛 OLD FORM 有馬喜兵衞 (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. The Lone Samurai and the Martial Arts p.66

ARINSU KOTOBA see: kuruwa kotoba

ARMY, IMPERIAL JAPANESE see: Dai Nippon Teikoku Rikugun (The Anime Companion 2 p.14)

ARRANGED MARRIAGE MEETING see: omiai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.101)

ARRANGED MARRIAGE see: kon'in (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.74)

ARROWROOT CAKE see: kuzu mochi (The Anime Companion 2 p.53)

ARROWS, NEW YEARS see: hamaya (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)

ART, EROTIC see: shunga (The Anime Companion 2 p.89)

ARYA-AVALOKITESHVARA see: Shōkannon Bosatsu

asagao (morning glory) 朝顔 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.397
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1007

ASAHI BREWERIES LTD. see: bīru (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.10)

Asakusa 浅草 OLD FORM 淺草 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.16
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.63
Web Site:
浅草い~とこ/asakusa-e.com

ASAKUSA 12 STORIES see: Ryōunkaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.75)

ASAKUSA KANNON TEMPLE see: Sensōji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.114)

Asakusa Jinja 浅草神社 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.63, 1348
A Look Into Tokyo p.28

ASAKUSA TWELVE STORIES see: Ryōunkaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.75)

ASAMA, MT see: Asamayama (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.7)

Asamayama 浅間山 OLD FORM 淺間山 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.63
Ashiarai Yashiki (Foot-Washing Mansion) 足洗邸
A strange yōkai manifesting as a giant bloody leg and foot that crashes into the room through the ceiling. This is accompanied with a loud voice demanding to be washed. The first sightings were in a mansion in the Honjo area of Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) hence the name Ashiarai Yashiki, which translates as "Foot-Washing Mansion." The first sighting was described by Matsura Seizan, daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15) of Hirado, in a book of his called the Kasshi-yawa ("Tales Begun on the Night of the Rat"). Later there were sightings of Ashiarai Yashiki in other parts of Edo and nearby areas.
Anime:
The Foot-Washing Mansion is one of three seven wonders of Honjo mentioned together in Ghost Slayers Ayashi (ep.9), the other two are the Callback Moat (oiteke-bori leave it behind) and the Raccoon Dog Festival Music (tanuki-bayashi).
Sources:
Yoda Hiroko and Matt Alt. Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide p.126
ashigaru (foot soldier) 足軽 (The Anime Companion 2 p.6)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.65
Turnbull, Stephen and Howard Gerrard. Ashigaru: 1467-1649
Turnbull S. R. and Richard Hook. Samurai Armies 1550-1615 p.32-33
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.57-59, 141

ASHIKAGA PERIOD see: Muromachi period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90)

Ashiya Dōman 蘆屋道満
An ommyōji who according to legend was jealous of Abe no Seimei's abilities and rapid promotion. Ashiya Dōman is said to have challenged Abe no Seimei to tests of his magical powers. The stories include the death of Ashiya Dōman as the result of one of the challenges. Many of the tales are found in a commentary on the Hoki-shō and in the Abe no Seimei Monogatari. Several bunraku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) and kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) plays include stories of their conflicts.
Anime:
Ashiya "Douman" is mentioned by Sasshi in Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi (ep.9)
Sources:
Goff, Janet E. "Conjuring Kuzunoha from the World of Abe no Seimei" in: Leiter, Samuel L. A Kabuki Reader p.269-283
Ashiya Dōman Ōuchi Kagami (Ashiya Dōman: A Mirror of the Imperial Court) 蘆屋道満大内鑑
One of, and the most famous of, several plays dealing with Abe no Seimei being born of Kuzunoha who is actually a white fox (see: kitsune, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.71). The play is known for its touching scene of the separation of the child and mother when her identity is revealed. Originally performed in 1734 as a bunraku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) play, it was adapted for kabuki (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) in 1735 and writen by Takeda Izumo the play is also known as Kuzu no Ha.
Anime:
The magician mentions "Ashiya Doh-man Oh-uchi Kagami" when he talks to Miyu and later we see part of a scene from the play acted out in Vampire Princess (ep.22).
Sources:
Leiter, Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.26-27
Nishiyama Matsunosuke. Edo Culture p.129
Aso-san (Mt. Aso) 阿蘇山 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.69
Web site:
Aso, Kyushu, Japan - Images at Volcano World

ASSASSIN see: hito-kiri (assassin)

ASSIGNATION TEAHOUSE see: ageya (rendezvous teahouses)

ASSISTANT COUNCILOR see: wakadoshiyori (junior councilors, young elders)

ASTROLOGERS see: Ommyōji

Atami 熱海 [市] (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.74
Web site:
Atami City
atena (address) 宛名 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.651

ATOMIC BOMB SURVIVORS see: hibakusha (atomic bomb survivors)

Atsumi Kiyoshi 渥美清
1928-1996 Real name Tadokoro Yasuo. One of the most famous modern comedic actors in Japan. He began his career in the early 1950s performing on stage in the Asakusa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5) area of Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) before moving to television and movies in the late 1950s. From 1969 to 1995 he starred in the highly popular and long running series of forty eight films, Otoko wa Tsurai Yo aka Tora-san, as well as doing some other films over the years. With his death from lung cancer on August 4 1996 the Otoko wa Tsurai Yo series came to an end. After his death the Japanese government bestowed the Kokumin Eiyo Shō (People's Honor Award) on Atsumi Kiyoshi.
Manga:
In Worst (v.1 p.80) Toranosuke visits Hana's room where Hana has just hung up a poster of Atsumi Kiyoshi in his Tora-san role.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.80
Schilling, Mark. The Encyclopedia of Japanese Pop Culture 269
Tora-san Collector's Booklet, included with the first box set released by AnimEigo

AUCTION BAR see: urisen bā

AV (Adult Video)
Adult videos are often referred to by the initials AV, the abbreviation of the english phrase. These are not erotic anime or Pink Films (pinku eiga, The Anime Companion 2 p.71) but very explicit live action films. One often sees the term Japanese AV or JAV used outside of Japan to refer to AV.
Anime:
AV is said by a scout as he tries to pick up Yura for an adult video gig in Step Up Love Story (Lesson 1).
City Hunter: the Motion Picture ends with a pair of sukebe guys very intently watching an AV.
Manga:
In Futari H Manga Sutra (v.1 p.32), without properly thinking about, it Makoto rents an adult video on his way home to Yura.
Sources:
Galbraith, Patrick. The Otaku Encyclopedia p.33

AVALOKITESHVARA see: Kannon

AVALOKITESVARA WITH ELEVEN HEADS see: Jūichimen Kannon Bosatsu (Eleven Faced Kannon)

AWA DANCE see: Awa odori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)

awa odori 阿波踊 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.87

AWAJI ISLAND see: Awajishima (The Anime Companion 2 p.7)

Awajishima 淡路島 (The Anime Companion 2 p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.87
ayame (iris) 菖蒲 (The Anime Companion 2 p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.624
Levy, Ran. Wild Flowers of Japan p. 239

AYATSURI JŌRURI see: bunraku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15)

Azabu 麻布 (The Anime Companion 2 p.7)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.88
Naito Akira. Edo: The City That Became Tokyo p. 19, 112
Azabu Jūban 麻布十番 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)
Sources:
A Look Into Tokyo p.132
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.88

AZABU NUMBER TEN HOT SPRING see: Azabu Jūban (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8)

azuki (a small red bean) あずき or 小豆
Phaseolus angularis. Azuki is also transliterated as adzuki or aduki. A small red bean brought to Japan from China in ancient times. Azuki is used in several dishes the best known of which are yōkan (The Anime Companion 2 p.117), amanattō, sekihan (The Anime Companion 2 p.81) and shiruko (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.122). This is the most common bean used to make an.
Anime:
In the first episode of Requiem From the Darkness a character who washes of azuki plays a significant, and sinister, role.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.25
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.129
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.91

AZUKI BEAN WASHER see: azuki arai (azuki bean washer)

azuki arai (azuki bean washer) 小豆洗い or あずきあらい
This bakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8) does one thing. He washes beans, nothing more. You usually can't see him, all you hear is the sound of the beans being cleaned and sometimes you may hear soft singing.
Anime:
The first episode of Requiem from the Darkness, and not one for the squeamish, involves an azuki arai.
Manga:
Kitsuneko fails in frightening Ren with azuki arai in Kon Kon Kokon (v.1 p.107).
Sources:
Koge-Donbo. Kon Kon Kokon v.1 p. 211

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Created: October 31, 1998

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