honjo Anime Companion - H

Anime Companion Supplement - H


Ha - Han - Har - Hat - He - Hi - Hit - Ho - Hu -

This series of pages is a supplement to two of my books The Anime Companion and The Anime Companion 2.

For easy browsing go to the: Topical / Subject Index

See the regular entry pages for cross references between variant terms, differing spellings, English to Japanese terms and names:
# - A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - Y - Z - Side Bars

Special Supplement: Rurouni Kenshin OVAs

Each Supplement page consists of:
1. A list of entries in the books with page numbers.
2. New entries for items not found in the books.
3. Japanese characters for entries
4. Secondary sources used to find information for each entry.
5. Additional information for some entries.
6. Links to select Internet resources related to the entries.

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For more information about this supplement see The Anime Companion Supplement main page. Additions are announced in the Anime Companion Supplement News page and in my Blog.

Hyphenated Japanese terms are listed as single words.

The inclusion of an anime or manga title in these entries is not a recommendation of that title, see my Recommended Anime and Manga page for a list of my recommendations


H see: hentai (The Anime Companion 2 p.27)

Hachikō ハチ公 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.37)
A Look Into Tōkyō p.136
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.36
hachimaki (headband) 鉢巻 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.37)
Sources:
Discover Japan v.1 p.40
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.18
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.483
Hachiman 八幡 (The Anime Companion 2 p.25)
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shintō p.40
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.484
Hachiōji 八王子[市] (The Anime Companion 2 p.25)
Source:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.484
Web Site:
Hachiōji City Official Site
Hagi 萩 [市] (The Anime Companion 2 p.25)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.485
Web Site:
Hagi official site
hagoita (paddle) 羽子板 OLD FORM 羽子板 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.38)
Sources:
Japanese Family and Culture p.75
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.54
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.485
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events p.92
haiku 俳句
A form of poetry consisting of 17 syllables in a structure of 5, 7, and 5 syllables. The term itself is from the 1890s while the style goes back much earlier. In earlier times these were considered a type of hokku. Hokku are beginning verses for haikai no renga, a poetic form consisting of alternating 5, 7, 5 and 7, 7 lines of poetry. The hokku became appreciated as short poems in their own right. Some of the most famous haiku poets include Basho (The Anime Companion 2 p.8), Yosa Buson and Kobayashi Issa (The Anime Companion 2 p.47). One historical person who is usually not thought of for his haiku is Hijikata Toshizō (The Anime Companion 2 p.28), one of the leaders of the Shinsengumi (The Anime Companion 2 p.86). In the late 19th century Masaoka Shiki led a movement to reform haiku and founded the magazine Hototogisu which is still devoted to haiku.
Anime and Manga:
Hijikata Toshizō's embarrassment with his haiku is part of the humor in Peacemaker and Peacemaker Kurogane.
Anime:
Captain Goto in Patlabor recites haiku on occasion.
In Tōkyō Godfathers Hana often pauses and recites haiku.
Manga:
Masaoka Shiki, haiku, and Hototogisu are mentioned in The Times of Botchan (v.1 p. 18)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.486-7

HAIR ORNAMENT see: kanzashi (hair ornament)

HAIR ORNAMENT WITH FLOWERS see:
hana-kanzashi (floral hairpin) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
tsumami kanzashi (flowery hair ornament)

HAIRPINS see:
hana-kanzashi (floral hairpin) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
kogai (hairpin)

HAIRPIN BEAD see: kanzashi dama (hairpin bead)

Haitōrei 廃刀令 (The Anime Companion 2 p.25)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.490
hakama (trousers) 袴 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.38)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.490
hakamairi (gravesite visit) 墓参り (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.38)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.85
Hakodate 函館 [市] OLD FORM incorrect in the book as 函館 or 箱館. I cannot reproduce the correct form here. (The Anime Companion 2 p.25)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.491
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Japan Encyclopedia p.180
Web Site:
Hakodate City Web Site
Hakone 箱根 [町] (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.38)
Sources:
Japan : An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.491
Web Site:
The Tourism and Industry Dept. of the Hakone Town Office.
Welcome to Hakonetown

HAKOZURI see: tsuribori

hakusai (Chinese cabbage) はくさい or 白菜
Chinese cabbage. Brassica campestris ver. amplexicaulis. This type of large cabbage is not round like Western cabbage but elongated with a length about twice the crosswise diameter. A variety of dishes use hakusai most commonly in nabemono (The Anime Companion 2 p.59) and tsukemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140), often salt preserved. Some specific uses are in kimuchi (kim chi), tanmen, okonomiyaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.100), shabu-shabu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.116), chūka-don, and to accompany tonkatsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.106)
Manga:
Chinese cabbage with tuna jerky is part of a dinner in Doing Time p.46.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.48
Illustrated Eating in Japan p.30, p.75, p.87, p.107

HALBERD see: naginata (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.91)

HALFCOAT see: haori (jacket) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)

HALL OF THE BAYING STAG see: Rokumeikan (Deer Cry Pavilion)

HAMAGURI GOMON INCIDENT see: Hamaguri Gomon no Hen (The Anime Companion 2 p.26)

Hamaguri Gomon no Hen 蛤御門の変 OLD FORM 蛤御門の變 (The Anime Companion 2 p.26)
Sources:
Hillsborough, Romulus. Ryoma: Life of a Renaissance Samurai p.241-242
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.494
hamaya 破魔矢 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.75
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shintō p.43
hamon (formal expulsion) 破門
In many disciplines and occupations, including entertainment, martial arts, religion and the yakuza (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.146) organizations, the instructor or boss has the right to expel any student or disciple no matter how high their level of accomplishment. Expulsion need not be permanent, some student are allowed to return. Today some martial arts instructors will simply ignore or be cold to a student rather than expel them. In the case of the yakuza they will send out a formal notice to friendly groups informing them of the expelled former member. Hamon is usually translated as "banishment" "expulsion" or "excommunication", the word literally means "broken or violated gate", one of many words that contain the kanji for mon (gate).
Anime:
In Samurai Champloo (v.3 ep.10) listen during the expulsion of Shoryu from the dōjō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.23) and you will hear the word hamon.
Manga:
In chapter 206 of Vagabond (v.23) Yoshioka Denshichirō tells Ueda "I banish you". Later in, chapter 218 (v.25, Ueda is shown a note that the banishment shall only last while Denshichirō is still alive.
Sources:
Coaldrake, William H. Architecture and Authority in Japan p.196
Hill, Peter B.E. The Japanese Mafia p,76
Japanese-English Buddhist Dictionary p.98
Leiter, Samuel. New Kabuki Encyclopedia p.419
Stark, David Harold. The Yakuza: Japanese Crime Incorporated p.105-106
han (daimyō domain) 藩 (The Anime Companion 2 p.26)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.265, 495

HAN LORD see: daimyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.15)

hanabi (fireworks) 花火 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
Sources:
A Look Into Tōkyō p.35)
Festivals of Japan p.174
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.376
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.42
hanafuda 花札 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.133
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.496

HANAGATSUO see: kezuribushi (The Anime Companion 2 p.45)

hana-kanzashi (floral hairpin) 花簪 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
Must-See in Kyōto p.63

HANAKARUTA see: hanafuda (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)

Hanako-san 花子さん
A modern bakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8) said to be a the ghost of a young girl who haunts a school toilet stall.
Anime:
In the first episode of Haunted Junction we find that the school has it's own Hanako-san, a seductive and somewhat slutty Hanako-san.
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Morphologies of Mystery p.302
hanami (flower viewing) 花見 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.39)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.497

HANAZONO GAI see: Gōruden Gai (Golden Gai)

Hanazono Jinja (in Shinjuku) 花園神社
A shrine (jinja; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.54) to Inari (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.48) located in Shinjuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.120) immediately East of Gōruden Gai (Golden Gai). The shrine had originally been nearby, where the Isetan department store is now, but had been moved in the 17th century to a garden belonging to a branch of the Tokugawa family (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.137). This shrine is known for its Tori no ichi (The Anime Companion 2 p.106), even though Inari shrines are not usually associated with this particular festival. On Sundays a flea market is held here. There is another shrine with this name in Ueno (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.142)
Anime:
In City Hunter (ep.37) Kikunosuke returns to Shinjuku after five years she comments how everything has changed, except for Hanazono jinja, later she and Ryo have a conversation on the shrine grounds.
Manga:
In Old Boy (v.5 p.175) Goto rests at Hanazono Jinja, part of the name is visible on a lantern, while on his way to Moon Dog in Golden Gai.
Sources:
Enbutsu Sumiko. Old Tōkyō: Walks in the City of the Shōgun p. 87
Tōkyō City Atlas 27 G2
Tōkyō Walking Around p.27
Waley, Paul. Tōkyō Now & Then p.427

HAND CLAPPING see: kashiwade (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.63)

HAND DRUMS see:

kotsuzumi

ōtsuzumi

tsuzumi

HAND GESTURES see:
Gestures (sidebar) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.148)
inzō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50)

HAND GUARD see: tsuba (The Anime Companion 2 p.107)

HAND SIGNS see inzō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50)

HANDBOOK OF MOTHERS AND CHILDREN see: Boshi Kenkō Techō (Maternal and Child Health Handbook)

HANDKERCHIEF see: hankachi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.40)

HANEDA AIRPORT see: Tōkyō Kokusai Kūkō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

HANEDA KŪKŌ see: Tōkyō Kokusai Kūkō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.138)

hanetsuki 羽根突き OLD FORM 羽根突き (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.40)
Sources:
Japanese Family and Culture p.75
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.54
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.498

HANGING POCKET see: inro (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.49)

HANGING SCROLL see: kakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59)

HANGYOKU see: maiko (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.78)

hankachi (handkerchief) ハンカチ (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.40)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman
Japanese Etiquette Today p.13
hanko (seal) はんこ or 判子 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.40)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.681
Discover Japan v.1 p.34
Tuttle, Charles E. Incredible Japan p.52
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1333
han'nya 般若
The Japanese pronunciation of the Sanskrit term prajñā often translated as "enlightenment" or "transcendental wisdom". In (The Anime Companion 2 p.63) the term is used to refer to roles of demonic women and is applied to a mask used for such roles. The mask has two horns and an open mouth with the lips curled back exposing the teeth.
Anime and Manga:
One of the characters in the early part of Rurouni Kenshin (v.3 p.35 and ep.8) is named Han'nya after the mask he wears.
Anime:
Kaede's ninja group's name is Han'nya in City Hunter 2 (ep.24).
Manga:
Near the end of volume 1 of Yagyu Ninja Scrolls: Revenge of the Hori Clan a figure wearing a han'nya mask enters the grounds of the Aizu (see: Aizu han The Anime Companion 2 p.4) Clan Katō family mansion in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18). In volume two the identity of this person is shown and others also use the mask.
In GTO The Early Years (v.6 chapter 92) we see a girl with the han'nya tattoo, we later find out she goes by the name of Yasha.
Sources:
Inagaki, Hisao. A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms p.92
Nearman, Mark J. "Behind the Mask of Nō" in Nō/Kyōgen Masks and Performance, edited by Rebecca Telle p.62
Hannya shingyō (Heart Sutra) 般若心経 FORMAL 般若心經
An important Buddhist (see: Bukkyō, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) text known in Sanskrit as the Prajñāpāramitā Hṛdaya Sutra. This sutra is a distillation of wisdom from the class of sutras known as Prajñāpāramitā (Perfection of Wisdom). The first copy to enter Japan in 609 is stored in Hōryūji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47) temple in Nara (The Anime Companion 2 p.61) and is written on tāla leaves in Sanskrit. There are six Chinese translations of the sutra, the 262 character one by Xuanzan (Hsüan-tsang) is the one commonly used in Japanese temples. The Hannya shingyō is one of the sutras commonly used in ceremonies petitioning buddhas, while performing austerities such as misogi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.85) or by groups of pilgrims at stages of their travel. The text may also be inscribed on or enclosed in lucky objects such as omamori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.100), pendants or even common items such as calculators. Legends tell of magical powers gained by the chanting of the sutra. Many Buddhist sects practice the daily recitation of this sutra and it is highly regarded in the Zen (The Anime Companion 2 p.122), Tendaishū and Shingonshū sects of Buddhism as well as in Shugendō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.124). Kūkai wrote commentaries on the sutra and it is the sutra most commonly used for the devotional practice of sutra copying (shakyō). Hand written copies of the text are also sometime offered to temples in memory of deceased individuals.
Anime:
Tokunaga chants the "Hannyashikyo" for Sayaka's protection at the All-Japan Women's Judo Championship in Yawara! (ep.34).
The Heart Sutra is mentioned by Doumeki in the xxxHOLiC TV series (ep.9).
Sources:
Bogel, Cynthea J. With a Single Glance: Buddhist Icon and Early Mikkyō Vision p.145, 233
Inagaki Hisao. A Dictionary of Japanese Buddhist Terms p.92
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.514
Miner, Earl et al. Princeton Companion to Classical Japanese Literature p.381
Payne, Richard K. Tantric Buddhism in East Asia p.210, 219
Reader, Ian. Practically Religious p.30, 216, 223
Reader, Ian. Religion in Contemporary Japan p.36, 121, 123, 126, 135, 176
Tanabe, George J. Jr. Religions of Japan in Practice p.155, 157, 248
hanpen (fish paste cake) はんぺん or 半片 or 半平 (The Anime Companion 2 p.26)
Sources:
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi. World Food Japan p. 259
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.50
Outlook on Japan p.151
Hanshichi 半七
A fictional investigator who was also known as Hanshichi of Kanda. Hanshichi is the main character of a series of stories written by Okamoto Kido between 1917 and 1937. The tales are set in the late Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) mainly in the city of Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) itself. Hanshichi does not have a family name as he was a commoner. Many of these stories are available in English in The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichi: Detective Tales of Old Edo. There is also a novel by famous translator Edward Seidensticker who took three of Okamoto Kido's stories and rewrote them into a single work entitled The Snake that Bowed.
Anime:
Given that the Lupin III series often makes references to fictional detectives by having them or their descendants appear in stories it is not a surprise to have a "Hanshichi of Mikawa" show up in the episode titled "Mercy Mercy Me" in Lupin the 3rd: From Moscow With Love (TV 11)
Sources:
Okamoto Kidō. The Curious Casebook of Inspector Hanshichi: Detective Tales of Old Edo, especially p.xvii, 17.
hanshō (fire alarm bell) 半鐘
An alarm bell often used to to alert people of a fire. These bells would be hung in a fire watchtower (hinomi). If the fire was far away the beats on the bell would be single, closer double, and when a fire is nearby the bell would be loudly beaten at a fast pace.
Anime:
In the Urusei Yatsura TV series (ep.76 story 99 "The Fire-Fightin' Mama Arrives!") Ataru rings a bell to bother Ten.
Such bells are also heard in Ninja Scroll and Saber Marionette J (ep. 2)
Manga:
A hanshō in a simple fire alarm tower, not much more than a stout ladder with a small roof and bell at the top is used in Samurai Executioner (v.2 p.26).
Sources:
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.175
haori (jacket) 羽織 OLD FORM 羽織 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.501
happi (coat) 法被 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)
Sources:
Festivals of Japan p.83
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.501
hara (stomach, belly) 腹 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.17
Harada Sanosuke 原田 左之助
1840- Harada was from Matsuyama Han in Iyo province on the island of Shikoku (The Anime Companion 2 p.84). He once attempted to commit seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115) and was left with a scar which he incorporated in his mon (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.89), a circle with a single horizontal line. Harada's preferred weapon was the yari (spear), he joined Kondō Isami's (The Anime Companion 2 p.49) Shieikan dōjō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.23) before the Rōshigumi was founded becoming one of the original captains or assistant vice-commanders of the Shinsengumi (The Anime Companion 2 p.86). While he was known to be short tempered he also was considerate to subordinates. Harada took part in the Ikedaya Jiken (The Anime Companion 2 p.30) killing several opponents. When Sakamoto Ryōma (The Anime Companion 2 p.76) was assassinated Harada was implicated on the highly questionable testimony of enemies, Shinohara Yasunoshin and other Kōdaiji faction members who were hiding in the Satsuma han (The Anime Companion 2 p.80) estate in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). After the Shinsengumi relocated to Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) Harada became one of the founders of the Seikyōtai, a militia that went to Aizu han (The Anime Companion 2 p.4). Harada Sanosuke later returned to Edo, joined the Shōgitai (The Anime Companion 2 p.86) and died in the Battle of Ueno, however a legend has him escaping to China and becoming a bandit chief.
Anime:
In Peacemaker Sanosuke first shows in the second episode.
Manga:
In Rurouni Kenshin (v.2 p.48) the author writes about how Harada Sanosuke was an inspiration for the characters Sagara Sanosuke.
In the first volume of Kaze Hikaru Harada is first mentioned (p.14), later shows up in person (p.27) and then promptly propositions the very cute main character saying he is not "that way" but willing to try anything once.
Sources:
Hillsborough, Romulus. Shinsengumi: The Shōgun's Last Samurai Corps p.30, 33, 44, 76-82, 131-32, 154-55, 183, 188.
Watsuki Nobuhiro. Rurouni Kenshin v.2 p.48
haraigushi (purification wand) 祓串
A purification wand. A wood stick, sometimes up to three feet long, with streamers (gohei; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.36)) made of paper or linen attached to it. These are used in Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) purification ceremonies waved horizontally over or towards that which is to be purified. Often haraigushi are mounted on a stand. Sometimes a branch of the sakaki 榊 evergreen is used instead of a stick.
Anime and Manga:
Sakura often carries a "purification wand" in Urusei Yatsura and it plays a significant role in the anime episode "Exercise: Exorcise! Beautiful Sakura" (ep.119 story 142).
Sources:
Basic Terms of Shintō (revised edition) p.14
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shintō p.45
Harajuku 原宿 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.501
Web Site:
Harajuku Digital World
Harajuku Takeshita Street

HARAKIRI see: seppuku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.115)

HARBIN see: Harubin

HARD BLACK SUGAR CANDY see: kuroame

HARD LIQUOR see: shōchū (The Anime Companion 2 p.86)

HARD SUGAR CANDY see: kuroame

hari (acupuncture) 鍼 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.41)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.6
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.64
Tuttle, Charles E. Incredible Japan p.54

HARIGATA see: harikata (dildo)

harikata (dildo) 張形
A dildo, a general term for any artificial penis. Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) manuals on masturbation include instruction on several ways, some very complex, to use this device. Included in some manuals are its use in foreplay between husband and wife as well as between two women. In shunga (The Anime Companion 2 p.89) prints harikata are sometimes depicted as tied to one woman of a pair. They could also be strapped to the ankle or heel then inserted using certain techniques, not a difficult thing to do when people normally sit on the floor. In the Edo Period female prostitutes were often trained using harikata. It could also be used by men in preparation for anal sex and there is at least one print of a male prostitute with one inserted anally about to service a woman in a more conventional way. In earlier times they were made of several types of material including wood, porcelain, leather, buffalo horn, and tortoiseshell. In modern times a variety of new materials are used as well as motors for vibration etc. Some of the other names used to refer to harikata are harigata, suigyū (water buffalo), and osugata (male shape).
Manga:
Lady Tsukiyama, Tokugawa Ieyasu's (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) wife, calls to her servant Chisa to serve her with a harikata in Path of the Assassin (v.6 p.15), later (v.9 p.53) Ieyasu spots her using one on herself.
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.12 p.14) a couple make a living with a sex show involving the woman using a harikata on herself.
Sources:
Bornoff, Nicholas. Pink Samurai p157-158
Dalby, Liza. Geisha p.55
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Sex and the Japanese p.124
Leupp, Gary P. Male Colors p.45, 175.
Uhlenbeck, Chris and Margarita Winkel. Japanese Erotic Fantasies p.147, 245
Walthall, Anne. ‘Masturbation and Discourse on Female Sexual Practices in Early Modern Japan’ Gender & History, Vol.21 No.1 April 2009, p.1–18.

HĀRĪTI see: Kishibojin

HARRIS TREATY see: Nichibei Shūkō Tsūshō Jōyaku (The Anime Companion 2 p.62)

HARU NO NANAKUSA see: nanakusa (seven herbs)

Harubin (Harbin) ハルビン
Harbin, a city in China, also known as Haerbin or Ha-erh-pin, in Heilongjiang (Heilungkiang) Province on the bank of the Sungari River. Originally this was a Russian railway settlement for the trunk lines to Vladivostok and Dairen (Dalian or Ta-lien). The settlement eventually became an major economic hub for Northern Manchuria. Japanese merchants became active in the city especially increasing in the 1920s. After the 1931-1933 seizure of Manchuria by the Japanese the city became a significant military site as the headquarters of the Guandong (Kwantung) Army until it was captured by the Soviets at the end of World War II who returned the area to China the following year. Today this is an industrial and food processing center.
Anime:
A module body is transported from Dairen to Harbin in Geo-Armor (Kishin Corps) (ep.3)
Manga:
The assasination of Itō Hirobumi in Harbin is shown in The Times of Botchan (v.2 p.47)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.503
harusame (spring rain noodles) はるさめ or 春雨
Thin transparent noodles made in Japan from potato or sweet-potato (satsumaimo; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.111) starch in Japan or in China from mung-bean starch. Commonly used in nabemono (The Anime Companion 2 p.59), sunomono or deep-fried (kara-age) until they turn white and puff up.
Manga:
In Doing Time (p.71-72) Hanawa and his cellmates are delighted at the large amount of harusame in a meal.
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.50

HARVEST MOON VIEWING see: tsukimi (moon viewing)

hashi (chopsticks) 箸 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.158
Living Japanese Style p.178
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki VardamanJapanese Etiquette Today p.67
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.26
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia 197
Today's Japan p.79

HASHI, METAL see: hibashi (metal hashi)

hashioki (chopstick rest) 箸置き
A simple rest for chopsticks (see: hashi, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42) to keep the smaller tips from touching the table. Hashioki are usually made of ceramic, however other materials such as wood or bamboo are also used. The proper etiquette for placing hashi on the hashioki is for them to be pointing to the left of the person using them.
Anime:
In the first part of Samurai X: Trust and Betrayal we see hashioki in front of Kenshin, with the hashi properly laid on them, as he drinks alone.
Ceramic hashioki are seen in episode four of Mirage of Blaze in the sequence in the raw horse meat (umasashi) and sukiyaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.126) restaurant.
In episode 1 of MahoRomatic we see a hashi on it's chopstick rest neatly laid out in front of a meal of oyakodon, pickled celery (the Japanese text on the screen says asatsuke, lightly pickled, cucumber (see: kyuri, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.78) and wakame (The Anime Companion 2 p.112) miso soup (see: misoshiru, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.85).
Manga:
Hashioki are visible in front of the diners in Oishinbo A la Carte: Japanese Cuisine (p.248).
Sources:
Illustrated Living Japanese Style p.178
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.90

HASHIBA HIDEYOSHI see: Toyotomi Hideyoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)

HASHUTSUJO see: koban (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.71)

hasu (lotus)
Nelumbo nucifera. A plant in the Water Lilly, Nymphaeaceae, family often used to decorate ponds in Japan. It is also found in marshes and rice fields. The plant is believed to have spread to Japan from India by way of China. The plant has it's roots in mud and a straight stem grows above the surface where round leaves form. The flowers grow on a separate, taller, stem, are white red or pink and bloom for a few days in the summer. The flowers open in the morning and close in mid-afternoon. The seeds are contained in a roundish 'fruit' that resembles a wasp nest. Seeds discovered in archaeological digs up to 2,000 years old have been germinated. The rhizome, renkon (The Anime Companion 2 p.73), is edible and used in several dishes. In Buddhism (Bukkyō The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.15) the lotus is symbolic of the human ability to rise above mud of the world and become enlightened.
Anime:
They are seen in Rurouni Kenshin (TV ep.62 ) as Kenshin walks after leaving an inn.
In Millennium Actress, where they are mentioned both as Chiyoko's favorite flower and the name of Tachibana's film company, however the plant that is shown is the suiren (water lily)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.902

HAT see: sando-gasa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.111)

hata (ceremonial banner) 旗 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.22
hatahata (sandfish) はたはた or 鰰 (The Anime Companion 2 p.26)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.51
hataki (duster) はたき (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42)
Japanese Family and Culture p.49
hatamoto (bannermen) 旗本 (The Anime Companion 2 p.27)
Sources:
Milton, Giles Samurai William p. 119, 320
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.508
Ratti, Oscar and Adele Westbrook. Secrets of the Samurai p.67-69
Who's Who of Japan p.174
hatsumōde 初詣 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.77
Today's Japan p.59
Must-See in Kyōto p.34
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.509
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shintō p.47
hatsuyume (first dream of the year) 初夢
The first dream of the new year, traditionally these are on the second night. This dream is of special significance foretelling the coming year and discussed among family the next day. An especially good one would include seeing the takarabune (treasure ship) or any other treasure ship, the rising sun, and in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) dreaming of Fuji-san (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.30), a hawk, or eggplant (see: nasu, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.91) were especially auspicious. In fact traditionally pictures are sold of the Shichifuku-jin (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.117) in the takarabune that if kept under the pillow are said to help to get a good dream. The ship can also be a folded origami (The Anime Companion 2 p.69) version rather than a print.
Anime:
In Kimagure Orange Road TV (ep.39) Kyosuke wakes up without having had his New Year's dream and feels like he has missed something.
Sources:
Chamberlain, Basil Hall. Japanese Things p.308.
Joya Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese 432.
Kiritani, Elizabeth. Vanishing Japan. Traditions Crafts & Culture p.156.
Outlook On Japan p.91.
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.75.
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.245.
Hattori Hanzō 服部半蔵
1541-96 A major leader of the Iga soldiers including ninja. His father, Hattori Yasunaga, was a retainer of Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102) and Hanzō fought in several battles for the Tokugawa starting when he was 16. After the assassination of Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65) Ieyasu was in danger of also being killed by the troops of Akechi Mitsuhide. Fleeing back to his domain Ieyasu was led to safety through the Iga territory by Hattori Hanzō and local warriors who came out to assist. Later Hattori Hanzō's Iga men became guards of the Edojō (The Anime Companion 2 p.18). The Hanzō gate is named after him and his home in Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) was nearby. His grave is on the grounds of the Seinenji temple in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104), his spear is in the collection of the temple.
Anime:
Hattori Hanzō is seen in several scenes in Samurai Deeper Kyo starting with episode 6.
Hattori Hanzō is mentioned by Kaede in City Hunter 2 (ep.24)
Manga:
He is also the main character of Path of the Assassin.
Sources:
Turnbull, Stephen. Ninja AD 1460 - 1650 p.11, 12, 12 (illustration of his grave), 25, 58
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.37
Waley, Paul. Tōkyō Now & Then p. 17

HAUNTING see: goryō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.36)

HAWKER see: yobi-komi (barker)

HAWSER see: tsuna (The Anime Companion 2 p.109)

Hayama 葉山 [町] (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.42)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.511
Web Site:
Welcome to HAYAMA
Hayashi Fumiko 林芙美子 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.43)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.512
haze (goby) はぜ or 沙魚 or 鯊 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.43)
Sources:
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.51
he (fart) 屁 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.43)
Sources:
Discover Japan v.2 p.192

HEAD CHOP ASAEMON see: Yamada Asaemon

HEAD OF CENSORS see: ōmetsuke (inspectors general)

HEAD TO THE NORTH see: kitamakura (pillow to the North)

HEADBAND see: hachimaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.37)

HEADBAND WITH CANDLES see: ushi no koku mairi (The Anime Companion 2 p.111)

headlights off (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.43)
Sources:
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.55

HEALTH (EUPHEMISM) see: fasshon herusu (fashion health)

HEALTH AND WELFARE MINISTRY see: Kōseishō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.74)

HEALTH DRINKS see: eiyō drinks (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.26)

Hearn, Lafcadio ハーン, L or ラフカディオ・ハーン (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.514

HEART SUTRA see: Hannya shingyō (Heart Sutra)

HEARTH see: irori (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50)

HEAVEN AND EARTH see: ame-tsuchi (Heaven and Earth)

HEAVENLY DOG see: tengu (mountain spirit) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.134)

HEAVENLY MAIDENS see: tennyo (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.135)

HEBIONNA see: nureonna (snake woman)

Heian Period 平安時代 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.517
Must-See in Kyōto p.177
Must-See in Nikko p.180
Heiankyō 平安京
The capital of Japan founded in 794. Dissatisfied with the older capital of Nara (The Anime Companion 2 p.61) the Emperor Kammu ordered a new capital, Nagaokakyō, built in 784. This decision was unpopular, after several disasters beset the new capital including the assassination of a major supporter of moving the capital, Fujiwara no Tanetsugu, it was decided to move it again. The newer capital was named Heiankyō, the name can be translated as "Capital of Peace and Tranquility". Chinese culture influenced the city with the location chosen partly according to the principles of Chinese fengshui (kasō The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.64) with mountains in the North, East and West, and the land open on the South with several rivers flowing through the area. The city design was even modeled on Xi-an (Chang’an) the capital of Tang (T'ang) China. This city design is the most visually identifying feature of the city; it is a grid of straight streets forming a large rectangle with the imperial palace at the northern end of the city. From the imperial palace southwards was the Suzaku-ōji, a broad boulevard ninety-two yards wide, possibly the widest street in the world at that time, which stretched all the way to the Rashōmon gate at the South end of the city. Over time the city underwent changes, including fires from earthquakes (jishin The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.54) and wars. Later it came to be called Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) and continued to be the imperial capital until 1868.
Anime:
In Gasaraki (ep.16) we get to see the layout of the streets of Heiankyō.
Eutus takes Sasshi to Heiankyō in Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi (ep.9)
Much of the first half of Otogi Zoshi is centered around Heiankyō.
Sources:
Dougill, John. Kyōto: A Cultural History p.1-
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.514
Heibon Panchi (Heibon Punch) 平凡パンチ
An adult men's magazine that began publication in 1965. The first issue was a very hot seller for the time with 550,000 copies being sold. A combination of soft core erotica, articles on fashion, cars, sports and other respectable male interests kept the magazine from having conflicts with government censors. In 1966 sales had reached a million issues a month. By the late 1960s the magazine had developed a rebellious side with an antiauthoritarian stance. In the 1970s it mellowed out and, with competition from other magazines with nude photos, started to loose market share. After the failure of numerous attempts to regain readership, including occasional outrageous articles and photos, the magazine announced it was going into "hibernation in the October 1988 issue and ceased publishing.
Manga:
Heibon Punch shows up a few times in the first volume of 20th Century Boys (p.7, 32, 183).
Sources:
Schilling, Mark. The Encyclopedia of Japanese Pop Culture p.65-68

HEIBON PUNCH see: Heibon Panchi (Heibon Punch) d

HEIKE FAMILY see: Taira (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)

Heike Monogatari 平家物語 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.522
Who's Who of Japan p.37
heikegani 平家蟹 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.426
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.253
Heisei Period 平成時代 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.523
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.55

HEISHI FAMILY see: Taira (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.130)

HENRO see: junrei (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.57)

hentai 変態 FORMAL 變態 (The Anime Companion 2 p.27)
Sources:
McCarthy, Helen and Jonathan Clements. The Erotic Anime Movie Guide p.187
Shogakukan Progressive Japanese-English Dictionary p.1582

HENTAI MANGA see: eromanga

HERBAL MEDICINE see: kampō (Chinese Medicine)

HERMAPHRODITE see: futanari

HERRING ROE see: kazunoko (herring roe)

HETTSUI see: kamado (The Anime Companion 2 p.39)

hibachi (charcoal heater) 火鉢 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.163
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.525
hibakusha (atomic bomb survivors) 被爆者
Not only those who survived the two atomic bombings of Nagasaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.90) and Hiroshima (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45) but also those who entered the areas shortly afterward are counted as hibakusha. The immediate effects of burns, nausea, diarrhea and bleeding were only part of the physical effects. Lower blood levels lasted in many for a decade and around 1960 an increase in the numbers of cancer deaths among survivors showed other effects could take decades to materialize. Not all hibakusha were Japanese there were also prisoners of war and non-Japanese civilians in the areas when the bombs were dropped and many of the early US troops who arrived in the areas developed symptoms due to exposure to radiation. Many of the survivors also had psychological traumas of seeing so many die as well as the loss of members of their families often resulting in extreme poverty due to the loss of bread earners. One of the most well known hibakusha is Taniguchi Sumiteru who survived severe burns and eventually became chairman of the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Survivors Council. His injuries were photographed by Joe O'Donnell, a US army photographer documenting the effects of the bombing. Decades later they met again and became close until O'Donnell died of radiation related illness in August 2007.
Anime and Manga:
Barefoot Gen, the author of which survived the Hiroshima bombing, is a ten volume manga series which was partly adapted into two anime features.
Manga:
A manga dealing with hibakusha and the long term effects on their families is Town of Evening Calm, Country of Cherry Blossoms.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.75-78
"Hibakusha: U.S. Army Photographer Also Suffered from Radiation." Mainichi Daily News February 28. 2008
hibashi (metal hashi) 火箸
Literally: fire chopsticks. Hibashi are metal chopsticks used for handing charcoal and pieces of burning wood. These are made of metal to avoid their burning which handling hot embers. Hibashi are most commonly seen stuck vertically, to one side, into a hibachi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.44) or sunken hearth (see: irori, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50).
Anime and Manga:
Hibashi are clearly seen in Inu Yasha (ep.1, v.1 ch.1) as Kagome and Kaede talk near the irori.
Manga:
Hibashi are seen in the hibachi at Hiroshi's home several times in A Drifting Life (p.17).
In the first chapter of Lady Snowblood (v.1 p.7-) Oyuki snatches hibashi from a irori and uses them to demonstrate her skills.
Sources:
Yamaguchi Momoo, Kojima Setsuko. A Cultural Dictionary of Japan p.144
Hibiya 日比谷 (The Anime Companion 2 p.27)
Sources:
Look Into Tōkyō p.98
Tōkyō Metropolitan Atlas p.5
Waley, Paul. Tōkyō Now & Then p. 30, 39-40
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.525

HIBUKI see: kakushibuki (hidden weapon)

HIDA MOUNTAINS see: Hida Sanmyaku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)

Hida Sanmyaku 飛騨山脈 OLD FORM 飛驒山脈(The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.526

HIDDEN WEAPON see: kakushibuki (hidden weapon)

HIDE AND SEEK see: kakurenbo

HIDETADA see: Tokugawa Hidetada

HIDEYOSHI see: Toyotomi, Hideyoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140)

HIDING BY THE SPIRITS see: kamikakushi

Hieizan (Mount Hiei) 比叡山 (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.527
Readicker-Henderson, Ed. The Traveler's Guide to Japanese Pilgrimages p.51-60
Stevens, John. The Marathon Monks of Mount Hiei

HIGH MASTER OF CALENDAR-MAKING see: reki-hakase (high master of calendar-making)

HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL see: Kōkō yakyū (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.73)

HIGHEST JOY see: Gokuraku (The Anime Companion 2 p.24)

HIGHWAY COMMISSIONER see: dōchū bugyō (commissioner of highways)

HIGO DRIED TARO STEMS see: higozuiki (Higo dried taro stems)

higozuiki (Higo dried taro stems) ひごずいき or 肥後ずいき or 肥後芋茎 or 白芋茎
The dried stems of the satoimo (taro) plant are called zuiki, the province of Higo was well known for producing these. One interesting use of the stems was as a sex tool, to use it in this manner involved winding a cord made of it around the shaft and head of the erect penis to provide greater stimulation of the woman. Hokusai in his shunga (erotic art) (The Anime Companion 2 p.89) print book Kinoe no Komatsu (Young Pine Saplings) includes an image of a couple with the man wearing a higozuiki.
Manga:
Dōa steals a rope made of higozuiki from Kashin Koji not knowing what it is in Blade of the Immortal (v.17 ch.3).
Sources:
Brinkley, Frank. Brinkley's Japanese-English Dictionary p.334
Uhlenbeck, Chris and Margarita Winkel. Japanese Erotic Fantasies p.160, 201, 245
Takahashi Morio. Pocket Romanized Japanese-English Dictionary p.1224
Web Site:
肥後ずいき専門店【熊本の民芸品こけし】A shop selling higozuiki sex tools today.
Higuchi Ichiyō 樋口一葉 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.532

HIGUCHI NATSUKO see: Higuchi Ichiyō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)

Hijikata Toshizō 土方歳三 (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)
Sources:
Who's Who of Japan p.153
Hillsborough, Romulus. Ryoma: Life of a Renaissance Samurai p.177
hijiki ひじき or 鹿尾菜
Hizikia fusiforme. A dark brown seaweed which is boiled and then dried. The boiling turns it black. You can buy the dried form in bags, it looks like short lengths of twisted black wire. To use it in cooking soak it for about half an hour, expect it to expand by about three times in size.
Anime:
Hijiki is in MahoRomatic episode 3.
Sources:
Eating in Japan p.151
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.52

HIKIITA see: naruko

hikikomori ひきこもり or 引き篭り
A term applied to a psychological condition of extreme withdrawal from society, even to the point of only having minimal contact with immediate family, or to a person suffering from this condition. The Japanese press has called this condition a silent epidemic. Cases of this condition are almost unknown outside Japan, for this reason cultural factors are considered to play a significant role in the development of hikikomori.
Anime and Manga:
Satou in Welcome to the NHK is a hikikomori who has finally stepped back into society.
Manga:
In IWGP: Ikebukuro West Gate Park (v.4 p.52) we meet Kuriko (Glyko) Morinaga a hikikomori with a hobby that turns out to be very useful in solving a mystery.
Sources:
Kary, Tiffany. "Total Eclipse Of The Son." Psychology Today; Jan/Feb 2003; 36, 1; p. 20
Sakamoto Noriyuki et al. "Hikikomori, Is It A Culture-Reactive Or Culture-Bound Syndrome? Nidotherapy And A Clinical Vignette From Oman." International Journal Of Psychiatry In Medicine, Vol. 35(2) 191-198, 2005
Watts, Jonathan "Public Health Experts Concerned About "Hikikomori." The Lancet; Mar 30, 2002 p.1131

HILT, SWORD HILT see: tsuka (The Anime Companion 2 p.108)

HIMEJI CASTLE see: Himejijō (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)

Himejijō (Himeji Castle) 姫路城 OLD FORM 姬路城 (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.534
Frederic, Louis. Japan Encyclopedia p.312
Papinot, E. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of Japan p. 155
Web site:
Himejijō official site

HIMITSU-SHŪ ("ESOTERIC SECT") see: Shingonshū (Shingon sect of Buddhism)

Hina Matsuri (Doll Festival) 雛祭 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)
Sources:
A Look Into Japan p.84
Japanese Family and Culture p.80
Vardaman, James M. and Michiko Sakaki Vardaman Japan From A to Z p.37-8
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.114
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.292
hinomi (fire lookout towers) 火見 or ひのみ
A simple fire watchtower. These developed in the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) to assist in the detection of fires and spreading the alarms of blazes. Originally these were under the control of samurai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.110) fire brigades and were at the most 9 meters tall, an exception were shorter and removable hinomi on the homes of local leaders. Around 1810 a Matsudaira samurai first hung a hanshō (fire alarm bell) from a hinomi. With the establishment of the town fire brigades permanent towers, waku hinomi, were built on taller houses. Eventually eight meter tall hinomi, called hinomiyagura, were built on top of the local police stations, jishin ban'ya, where firefighting equipment would also be stored.
Manga:
A hinomi in Lone Wolf and Cub (v.18 p.19) is shown from above in a city scene.
A hinomi, not much more than a stout ladder with a small roof and bell at the top, is used in Samurai Executioner (v.2 p.26).
Sources:
Naito Akira. Edo: The City That Became Tōkyō p.85, 135
Turnbull, Stephen. Samurai Warlords p.99

HINOMIYAGURA see: hinomi (fire lookout towers)

HIP WRAPPING see: koshimaki (hip wrapping)

Hiraizumi 平泉
A town located in the province of Mutsu no Kuni, today it is in Iwate ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.33) on the Kitakami river. In the 8th century Hiraizumi became an important military site and in 1094 Fujiwara no Kiyohira and his vassals settled there making it the headquarters of the Ōshū Fujiwara. The productive gold fields of the area enabled the Fujiwara to gain a degree of independence and build or rebuild several temples such as Chūsonji, Mōtsuji and Muryōkōin. When the family fell from power in 1189 the area continued to be important as a religious center and the remains of some of the temples still exist today.
Anime:
In Lupin the 3rd Royal Scramble (ep. "Khan Job") Hiraizumi in Iwate Ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.33) is where Goemon's ancestral grave is located. This episode also mentions that this is where Minamoto no Yoshitsune (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.84) died .
Manga:
Rōben and Gao travel to Hiraizumi in "Ohshu" (Mutsu no Kuni) in Phoenix (v.4 Karma p.113)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.537
Web Site:
平泉町ホームページ
Japan National Tourist Association English web page on Hiraizumi

HIRAGANA see: kana (syllabary) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.60)

HIRAYAMA TŌGO see: Saikaku

hirekatsu (fried pork filet) ヒレカツ (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)
Sources:
Ashburne, John & Abe Yoshi World Food Japan p.259

HIROHITO (SHŌWA EMPEROR) see: Shōwa Tennō (The Anime Companion 2 p.88)

HIROMEYA see: chindonya (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.19)

Hiroshima 広島 [市] (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.541
Web site:
The City of Hiroshima Homepage
hisago (gourd) 瓠 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.542
hitaikakushi (triangle on forehead) 額隠し
A white triangle which is attached to the forehead of a corpse. The word literally means "forehead cover". Originally these were a charm against evil spirits placed on a corpse's head to guard the dead. The most common place to see them depicted is on the forehead of ghosts and occasionally on bodies during preparation for a funeral.
Anime:
Tylor is dressed as a ghost with a hitaikakushi on his head in Irresponsible Captain Tylor (ep. 12)
Manga:
In Lone Wolf and Cub (v.15 p.296) we see one on a body which is placed in a coffin.
Sources:
Screech, Tim. "Japanese Ghosts", Mangajin No. 40 p.15
hitodama (spirit lights) 人魂 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.46)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.547
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.436, 501
hitogata (human shaped dolls) 人形
A general term for human shaped dolls, the Chinese characters (see: kanji, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.61) used for this word literally translate as "human form" and the same kanji can also be pronounced ningyō. Japanese dolls can be complex works of art with great detail or very crude basic shapes. Complex ones can be large, even the same size as an adult and simple ones can be made from folded paper or crudely carved wood. They can also be used in religious or magical rituals to curse a person, for example in nailing a doll to a tree (see: ushi no koku mairi, The Anime Companion 2 p.111).
Anime and Manga:
In Ghost Hunt (v.3 p.109, 150, ep.8) hitogata, simply made from wood, are used to curse as well as katashiro to substitute for persons who are in danger from a curse.
Anime:
Sasshi says he can use paper hitogata to cast magic in Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi (ep.10).
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.292
Nelson, John K. Enduring Identities p.47
hito-kiri (person cutting) 人切り or 人斬り
Literally 'person cutting' the term was also applied to executioners. During the Bakumatsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.8) hito-kiri was also the nom de guerre used by two assassins in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). These were Okada Izō and Tanaka Shinbē who worked under orders from Takechi Zuizan. In the early 1860s they carried out various killings in their fight against the government.
Anime and Manga:
Kenshin is at times referred to as a hito-kiri in Rurouni Kenshin (v.1 p.8) or even, as in Rurouni Kenshin: The Motion Picture, specifically as Hitokiri Batousai for his use of battō-jutsu (The Anime Companion 2 p.9).
Sources:
Hillsborough, Romulus Shinsengumi p.66

HITOTSUBASHI KEIKI see: Tokugawa Yoshinobu (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)

HITOTSUBASHI YOSHINOBU see: Tokugawa Yoshinobu (The Anime Companion 2 p.104)

Hitotsume Kozō (one eyed boy) 一つ目小僧
A mischievous type of yōkai in the form of a boy with one eye. Hitotsume Kozō are usually depicted with the eye in the middle of the face, a long tongue, dressed in traditional clothes; often of a novice monk and either bald or with a shaved head. This yōkai enjoys scaring people by jumping out of hiding or going into houses and causing trouble. Tradition in the Kantō (see: Kantō Chihō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.61) and Tōhoku region (Tōhoku Chihō) has Hitotsume Kozō visiting on the night of kotoyōka. In some areas baskets or colanders are hung in doorways or on a pole in fromt of the house to keep Hitotsume Kozō away. The legends regarding Hitotsume Kozō began in the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) and have a large number of variants.
Manga:
A kitsune (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.71 disguises himself as Hitotsume Kozō and jumps out of hiding to frighten Arale in Dr Slump (v.3 p.8), later (v.10 p.173) we see Hitotsume Kozō on a page filled with other bakemono (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.8).
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.547
Yoda Hiroko and Matt Alt. Yokai Attack! The Japanese Monster Survival Guide p.158-161

HITSUJIGUSA see: suiren (water lily)

hiuchi-ishi (flint and steel) 燧石 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.46)
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.319
hiyamugi (ひやむぎ or 冷麦), sōmen (そうめん or 素麺) (two kinds of noodles) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.46)
Sources:
Condon, Jack and Camy Condon. The Simple Pleasures of Japan p.86
Hosking, Richard. A Dictionary of Japanese Food p.54, 145
Eating in Japan p.95

HOE see: kuwagara (The Anime Companion 2 p.53)

hōkan (male geisha) 幇間
Male geisha (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.33) who are also known as taikomochi and sometimes referred to as otoko geisha, which means literally "male geisha". These types of entertainers originated in the Hōreki era in the mid 18th century, though some say they go back to the 17th century. Hōkan were the first geisha and that term originally referred to them before women became geisha. People organizing parties in pleasure quarters such as the Yoshiwara would hire one or two hōkan to liven things up. The other name they are commonly known by, taikomochi, means drum carrier and likely refers to the drum many carried in earlier times, there are other theories of the terms origins, sometimes it is simply abbreviated to 'taiko'. Like jesters in Europe the role of the hōkan is add liveliness to parties and festivities with jokes, dances, songs, impersonations etc. Much of the humor of the routines which have survived are very off color and earthy. Today less than ten professional hōkan are still performing, mainly in the Asakusa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.5) area of Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104), though some inns in other parts of Japan will have male performers who do some of the routines and amusing dances.
Anime:
In a conversaion in episode 14 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi the phrase otoko geisha is translated as "jester".
Sources:
Downer, Lesley. Women of the Pleasure Quarters p.95-100
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.551
Seigle, Cecilia Segawa. Yoshiwara: The Glittering World of the Japanese Courtesan p.66, 117-119, 256n.30
Hokkaidō 北海道 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.46)
Sources:
Today's Japan p.52
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.551
Web site:
Hokkaido (official site)

HOKEKYŌ see: Myōhōrengekyō (Lotus Sutra)

HOKKE SECT see: Nichirenshū (Nichiren sect)

HOKKEKYŌ see: Myōhōrengekyō (Lotus Sutra)

hokora (small wayside shrine)
A very small Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) shrine, either within the grounds of a larger shrine or by the side of a road or path. Originally the term was applied to sacred storehouses and other shrine buildings. In time it came to the present meaning of a very small shrine.
Anime:
Very early in Spirited Away after seeing a large number of small hokora at the base of a tree with a miniature torii (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.139) in front of it on the dirt road Chihiro asks her mother what the "little houses" are.
A hokora in the form of a large upright stone is seen with offerings and a shimenawa (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.118) at the entrance to a group of nagaya (The Anime Companion 2 p.59) in Sakura Wars TV (ep.2).
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.54
Hokushin Ittō Ryū 北辰一刀流 (The Anime Companion 2 p.28)
Sources:
Draeger, Donn F. Classical Budo p.84
Frederic, Louis. Dictionary of the Martial Arts p.53
Skoss, Diane, ed. Keiko Shokon: Classical Warrior Traditions of Japan volume 3 p. 116-7

HOLOTHURIAN see: namako

HOMAGE TO AMIDA BUDDHA DANCE see: nenbutsu odori (dancing nembutsu)

HOME DELIVERY OF PREPARED FOOD see: demaé (The Anime Companion 2 p.16)

HOME MINISTRY see: Naimushō (The Anime Companion 2 p.60)

HOME SHRINE see: kamidana (Shintō altar) (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.60)

HOMOSEXUAL, MALE (DEROGATORY) see: okama (The Anime Companion 2 p.67)

homurūmu (homeroom) ホームルーム (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Sources:
Rohlen, Thomas Japan's High Schools p.178-
honban (real performance, real thing) 本番
In theater the term is used to indicate the difference between an actual performance and mere rehearsals. It is also a euphemism, used mainly by men, to refer to having sex. In the fūzoku (sex industry) it is specifically used to refer to male-female genital intercourse, this act is what differentiates the legal sex trade from ura fūzoku (illegal sex industry).
Anime:
Moko sells honban to her customers in My Fair Masseuse.
Sources:
Cherry, Kittredge. Womansword p.117
Sinclair, Joan. Pink Box: Inside Japan’s Sex Clubs p.187
honden (main shrine) 本殿
In Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) this is the main or inner sanctuary of a shrine (see: jinja, The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.54), this is the building where the kami (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59) is enshrined. These are often located in the back of the shrine grounds. Some ancient jinja have no separate building for the honden, or even buildings at all as a local mountain or island may perform that function.
Anime:
Saegusa Matsuri asks her younger sister Miko to open the honden in Kami Chu! (ep.2), later we see the girls performing kashiwade (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.63) there.
Sources:
Basic Terms of Shinto (revised edition) p.17
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.54
Picken, Stuart D.B. Essentials of Shintō p.127-128, 162
Hon'imbō (Grand Master of Go) 本因坊
Sometimes transliterated as Hon'inbo. A title given to the grand masters of the game go (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.36). The term originally referred to a residence hall for the Nichirenshū (Nichiren sect) temple Jakkōji in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77). A monk there named Nikkai was famous for his skill at go and went by the name Hon'imbō Sansa. He eventually became the go tutor for Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65), Toyotomi Hideyoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.140) and Tokugawa Ieyasu (The Anime Companion 2 p.102). In the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) a stipend was established for certain hereditary lines of go masters including the Hon'imbō line. This lineage was to merge with others to form the present day Nihon Kiin. Today Hon'imbō is a title granted annually as a result of a professional match between high ranking players.
Manga:
Hon'inbo Shusaku, one of the most famous players in history, is mentioned in Hikaru no Go (v.1 p.24) and Hon-inbo Nikkai is seen in a play in Hikaru no Go (v.6 p.182)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.558

HON-IN-DAIJIN see: Fujiwara no Tokihira

Honjo [Tōkyō] 本所
A neighborhood in Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) located east of the Sumidagawa (The Anime Companion 2 p.93). During the early Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) it was originally outside of the city of Edo (The Anime Companion 2 p.18) on the other side of the Sumidagawa. After the Meireki fire of 1657 Honjo was one of the designated areas for wood and charcoal. After the construction of the Ōhasi, later called the Ryōgokubashi (The Anime Companion 2 p.74), bridge in 1660 the land reclamation in Honjo increased. The east side of the bridge was close to Ekōin temple, built in the memory of those who died in the 1657 fire. With the opening of the bridge many built fine homes there including that of Kira Yoshinaka and it was at his mansion that the famous Akō Jiken (Akō incident) took place. Japan's first astronomical observatory was built in Honjo in 1689. During the Meiji Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.81) sparsely populated Honjo became the location of many new factories as Japan modernized. In 1878, Honjo was itself the name of a ward, in 1947 it would be merged with Mukōjima to become part of the new Sumida-ku. The floods of 1910 resulted in many of the owners of villas leaving the area. In the fire after the Tōkyō Earthquake of 1923 (see: Kantō Daisinsai, The Anime Companion 2 p.41) something like 40,000 died in the grounds of the Military Clothing Depot north of Ryōgoku Station in Honjo. World War II also caused great damage to Honjo with the entire area burned to the ground in the fire bombings. Today the area is known for its large number of small businesses.
Anime:
In You're Under Arrest: Fast & Furious (File 5) Ken heads towards "Honjo block 1".
In episode 9 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi strange things are reported to be happening in Honjo mirroring the Seven Wonders of Honjo (see: Kasshi-yawa ("Tales Begun on the Night of the Rat")). Also episode 14 of Ghost Slayers Ayashi opens with a raid on an "unsanctioned red light district in Honjo."
Manga:
That Itō Sachio was in the dairy cow business in Kayaba, Honjo is mentioned in The Times of Botchan (v.2 p.15).
Sources:
Bilingual Atlas of Tokyo 32 D3
Cybriwsky, Roman. Tokyo: The Shogun's City at the Twenty-First Century p.83
Naito Akira. Edo: The City That Became Tokyo p.104, 112, 114-115, 127
Seidensticker, Edward. Low City, High City p.214-20
Seidensticker, Edward. Tokyo Rising p.144-5
Tokyo City Atlas 59 F2
Waley, Paul. Tokyo: City of Stories p.20, 23, 170-76

HON-MIRIN see: mirin

Honnōji 本能寺
A famous Nichirenshū temple in Kyōto (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.77) presently located near the Ōike Dōri. This temple is where the troops of Akechi Mitsuhide attacked Oda Nobunaga (The Anime Companion 2 p.65) in 1582. A monument to Oda Nobunaga stands on the grounds to the south of the man hall in the shade of a 350 year old gingko (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.35) tree.
Anime:
Oda Nobunaga going to "Honno Temple" is mentioned by Shatora in Samurai Deeper Kyo (v.3 ep.14)
Nobunaga's death at Honnoji is mentioned in Mirage of Blaze (ep.7)
The attack itself is seen in Wrath of the Ninja: The Yotoden Movie
Sources:
Clancy, Judith. Exploring Kyōto p.90
Turnbull, Stephen. The Samurai Sourcebook p.68

HONOR THE EMPEROR, EXPEL THE BARBARIANS see: sonnō jōi (The Anime Companion 2 p.90)

HONORARIUM see: kenrikin (key money)

Honshū 本州 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.560
hōō (phoenix) 鳳凰
Usually translated as phoenix. The hōō is a mythical Chinese bird traditionally believed to appear when a holy king is about to be born. In Shintō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.121) a mikoshi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.82) with a hōō on top is called a hōren.
Anime:
The Ranma ½: One Flew Over the Kuno's Nest movie, released in the US in the OVA series, Kuno buys the egg of a hōō which of course leads to trouble.
Manga:
In Tezuka's famous manga series Phoenix the bird is based on legends of the European phoenix even if it is drawn in the style of the hōō.
In Silent Möbius (v.1, p.115) Nami speaks of the "phoenix" as one of the go-rei, five spirits. The others are the kirin, dragon (see: ryū; The Anime Companion 2 p.75), tiger, and the tortoise.
Sources:
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.56
Illustrated Must-See in Nikko p.69
Illustrated Must-See in Kyōto p.171

HOOD FOR FIRE PROTECTION see: bōkū-zukin bōkū-zukin (anti-air raid hood)

HOOK ROPE see: kaginawa (hook rope)

HOOLIGAN see: chinpira (punk, thug)

Hoppō Ryōdo modai (Northern Territories Issue) 北方領土問題
The Northern Territories Issue. When the fighting ended at the end of World War II troops of the Soviet Union had occupied Japanese held territories on the Siberian mainland and Northern islands. These islands included Habomai, Kunashiri, Etorofu and Shikotan. In the San Francisco Peace Treaty with 48 of the allied nations, excluding the Soviet Union, Japan gave up the rights to the Kiril Islands. The Soviet Union then claimed the disputed islands are part of the Kiril chain and Japan asserts they are not. After decades of refusal to negotiate on this matter the Soviet Union agreed in 1991 to include the sovereignty of the islands in future negotiations of a peace treaty between the two nations. The peace treaty is still, as of June 2006, under negotiation.
Anime and Manga:
In both the Ghost in the Shell manga ("07 Phantom Fund", 2nd ed p.151-) and the Ghost in the Shell S.A.C. 2nd GIG (ep.6) TV series the Major travels to Etorofu.
Anime:
In Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex (ep.19) the Northern Territories Mafia is mentioned
Manga:
The Northern territories dispute with Russia is mentioned in Sanctuary (v.6 p.132 and v.9 p. 13)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1115

HORIMONO see: irezumi (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.50)

HORNED FINGER see kakute

HORNED HAND see kakute

HORROR MANGA see: kyōfu manga (terror manga)

HORSE MACKEREL see aji (saurel, horse mackerel)

HORSE'S LEG see: uma-yaku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.143)

Hōryūji 法隆寺 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Sources:
Who's Who of Japan p.16, 19
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.564
hoshi-suna ("star" sand) 星砂 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Sources:
Japanese Inn & Travel p.140
Hōsō no kami (smallpox kami) 疱瘡神
The kami (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.59) of smallpox, also known as Hōsōgami and Hōsōshin. This kami spreads smallpox, traditionally dōsojin were placed at the village boundary to chase him away. In modern times, with smallpox no longer a threat, this kami has become associated with diseases in general.
Manga:
In ōoku (v.1 p.16) there is an illustration of a diseased figure with the "Redface Pox" the last three kanji (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.61) spell out Hōsō no kami.
Sources:
Ashkenazi, Michael. Handbook of Japanese Mythology p.297
Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto p.56

HŌSŌGAMI see: Hōsō no kami (smallpox kami)

HŌSŌSHIN see: Hōsō no kami (smallpox kami)

HOST CLUB see: hosuto kurabu (host club)

HOSTESS see: hosutesu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)

HOSTESS FEES see: hosutesu ryō

hosutesu ("hostess") ホステス (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Discover Japan v.1 p.88
hosutesu ryō (hostess fees) ホステス料
Fees for a hostess (hosutesu; The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47) in a hostess club are charged by the hour. Add to this the cost of drinks as well as snacks and the amount on a bill quickly mounts. Regular customers can run up a tab in most clubs. However in many clubs collecting the money is the responsibility of the hostess not the bar owner. This means if she cannot get the money from the customer she will have to pay the bill herself, a bill which can be quite large.
Anime:
In the opening of City Hunter: The Motion Picture we see Ryo cornered by a posse of hostesses from several clubs he owes money to. He tries to get out of paying cash by offering his body to the women and almost succeeds until Erica, a large cross-dressing 'hostess' insists on going first.
Sources:
Bornoff, Nicholas. Pink Samurai p.262
De Mente, Boye Lafayette. Sex and the Japanese p.145
hosuto kurabu (host club) ホストクラブ
Host club, a nightclub for women which have attractive male hosts to pamper the clients rather than the female hosutesu (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47) of regular clubs. This branch of the mizushōbai came into being with growth of a large number of single young women with disposable income. These clubs are not cheap, an evening at a high end club can cost an office worker the majority of a month's salary. It is not only the cost of the drinks and time spent that rack up, some women will buy their hosts gifts. Much like hostess clubs and male executives that patronize them women executives will take female clients to host clubs for entertainment while negotiating a deal. Sometimes women who work in the mizushōbai will patronize host clubs, perhaps this is one reason Kabukichō (The Anime Companion 2 p.35) has so many host clubs.
Anime:
Kumiko's class is doing a host club for the school culture festival in The Gokusen (ep.9), however they are not taking the job very seriously.
Manga:
Ouran High School Host Club involves a high school club that runs it's own host club on campus.
In IWGP: Ikebukuro West Gate Park (v.1 p.53) Makoto tells Hikaru she does not have to buy him and his friends presents as they are not her hosts.
Sources:
Macias, Patrick and Machiyama Tomohiro. Cruising the Anime City p.139
Richie, Donald. The Image Factory p.71-74

HOT PLATE see: teppan (The Anime Companion 2 p.99)

HOT POT DISHES see:

chirinabe (The Anime Companion 2 p.12)

nabemono (The Anime Companion 2 p.59)

gyūnabe (The Anime Companion 2 p.24)

sukiyaki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.126)

HOT RODDERS see: bōsōzoku (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.14)

HOT SPRINGS see: onsen (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.102)

HOT TEA OVER RICE see: chazuke (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.18)

HOT WATER HEATER, WALL MOUNTED see: yuwakashiki (The Anime Companion 2 p.120)

hotaru (firefly) 蛍 OLD FORM 螢 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.47)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.376
Hotei 布袋 (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.48)
Sources:
Schuhmacher, Stephan, Gert Woerner editors, The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy and Religion p.282
Hototogisu (magazine) ホトトギス
A magazine begun in Matsuyama in 1897 originally as part of the haiku reform movement led by Masaoka Shiki, who was also the editor. When Takahama Kyoshi became editor and publisher in 1898 the magazine relocated to Tōkyō (The Anime Companion 2 p.104) and became a general literary magazine for a time. Today it is still published and continues to be devoted to haiku.
Manga:
In The Times of Botchan (v.1 p.15) Natsume Sōseki (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.91) speaks of his writing Botchan for Hototogisu.
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.568

HOUSE ELDER see: karō (house elder)

HOUSE OF ASSIGNATION see: ageya (rendezvous teahouses)

HOUSE OF CRY OF THE STAG see: Rokumeikan (Deer Cry Pavilion)

HOUSEHOLD DIVISION see: hatamoto (bannermen) (The Anime Companion 2 p.27)

HOUSEHOLD REGISTER koseki (household register)

HOUSEMEN see: gokenin (vassals, housemen)

HOUSING COMPLEX see: danchi (housing complex)

HOUSING COMPLEX WIFE see: danchizuma (housing complex wife)

HŌZŌIN IN'EI see: Kakuzenbo Hoin In'ei

HŌZŌIN INSHUN see: Kakuzenbo Inshun

Hōzōin-ryū 寳藏院流
A ryū (The Anime Companion 2 p.75) of yari (spear) fighting established by Kakuzenbo Hoin In'ei and continued by Kakuzenbo Inshun. Several other schools of spear fighting grew out of this one including the Takeda-ha-ryū, the Nakamura-ryū, the Shimoda-ha-ryū, the Nagao-ha-ryū, the Isono-ryū and the Oroshi-ha-ryū. The Hōzōin-ryū continues to exist today and the main dōjō (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.23) is said to have one of the finest buildings of it's kind in Japan.
Manga:
In Vagabond starting in volume 4 and continuing for a few volumes afterwards we see many scenes with practitioners of this ryū at Hōzōin temple.
Sources:
Knutsen, Roald & Patricia. Japanese Spears: Polearms and Their Use in Old Japan p.82-
hōzuki (chinese-lantern plant) 酸奬 (The Anime Companion 2 p.29)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.573
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p. 505
Waley, Paul. Tōkyō Now & Then p,199

hōzuki ichi (chinese-lantern plant market) 酸奬市 (The Anime Companion 2 p.29)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.573, 576
Pictorial Encyclopedia of Japanese Life and Events p.53
Waley, Paul. Tōkyō Now & Then p,199

HUMAN SHAPED DOLLS see: hitogata (human shaped dolls)

HUNDRED DAY MEN see: tōji (sake master brewer)

HUNDRED DEMONS see: hyakki yagyō (night procession of 100 demons)

HUNGRY GHOSTS see: gaki (hungry ghost)

hyakki yagyō (night procession of 100 demons) 百鬼夜行
Sometimes romanized as hyakki yakyō or hyakki yako. A parade of demons and fantastic creatures such as tsukumogami (spirit of a made object). Tradition says that merely seeing such an event could even result in death. These were often humorously visually represented in scrolls known as hyakki yakyō emaki. In the Okagami there is an account of Fujiwara no Morosuke encountering such a procession and protecting himself by chanting the Sonshō Dhārani.
Anime:
Cavorting figures from a hyakki yagyō are seen in Pom Poko during the mass illusion sequence.
In the extras portion of Doomed Megalopolis Rintaro mentions "Hyakki Yagyo".
Manga:
In Phoenix (v.9 p.114) there is mention, with examples, of Tosa Mitsunobu's "Hyakki Yako" scroll.
In Inu-Yasha (v.9 p.166) we see "a pack of demons".
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Morphologies of Mystery p.11-13
The Ōkagami: The Great Mirror. Translated by McCullough, Helen Craig p.136

HYAKKI YAKO see: hyakki yagyō (night procession of 100 demons)

HYAKKI YAKYŌ see: hyakki yagyō (night procession of 100 demons)

hyakumonogatari (100 stories) 百物語
A gathering of people to tell various spooky tales. Traditionally a light was lit for each tale, while the term means "100 stories" the number could be smaller. As each tale is told a light would be extinguished, when all the lights were out something unusual was supposed to happen. Some traditional explanations for doing such an event specify that weapons must be hidden, probably to prevent accidents from taking place when someone was frightened. It is believed this was originally a test of bravery (see: kimodameshi) for bushi (The Anime Companion 2 p.11). In the Edo Period (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.25) the storytelling became an entertainment. There were written collections of such tales which were also called hyakumonogatari.
Anime and Manga:
At the beginning of Ghost Hunt (ep.1, vol.1 p.3) we see some girls telling spooky stories and turning off a flashlight after each one.
Anime:
In the first episode of Requiem from the Darkness we find out that Momosuke is collecting together 100 stories for a printed hyakumonogatari collection.
Sources:
Foster, Michael Dylan. Pandemonium and Parade 52-55

HYAKUNICHI OTOKO see: tōji (sake master brewer)

HYAKUNIN-ISSHU see: uta karuta (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.144)

HYDRANGEA see: ajisai (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.4)

HYŌGO see: Kōbe (The Anime Companion 2 p.47)

Hyōgo Ken 兵庫県 OLD FORM 兵庫縣 (The Anime Companion 2 p.29)
Sources:
Japan: An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.578
Web site:
Hyogo Prefecture (official site)

HYŌGO PREFECTURE see: Hyōgo Ken (The Anime Companion 2 p.29)

HYŌTAN see: hisago (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.45)

Hyottoko (mask of funny faced man) ひょっとこ
A mask of a funny faced man, often this mask is seen with one of Okame (The Anime Companion [vol.1] p.99) a fat faced girl. Players wearing masks of these two characters will often put on short funny plays at shrine and temple festivals. The Hyottoko mask shows a man with a spouting mouth and sometimes one eye being smaller than the other. To call someone by these terms is insulting but can be used in a joking sense.
Anime:
In Pom Poko we see the mask, and one of Okame, during a rowdy celebration.
Sources:
Joya, Mock. Mock Joya's Things Japanese p.525
Japan : An Illustrated Encyclopedia p.1137

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Created: September 24, 1998

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